Track System Turnout

I was first introduced to the idea of track systems ten years ago, as a method of encouraging horses to move around their paddocks more. It was predominantly aimed at companions, the laminitis prone, and obese. The friend who first set it up definitely noticed an improvement in the waistlines of her unridden equines. She sets up a track around the edge of her hay field, and cuts hay from the centre of the field, while the ponies graze the edges which are harder to cut with the tractor.

But they’ve evolved. Track systems are now hugely complicated, focus on enrichment and often have different “areas”. There are social media groups for the obsessed. It’s almost a culture, like those who have barefoot horses.

As with anything, I sit firmly in no man’s land. Barefoot is great if your horse is happy without shoes. But if they’re not, then give their hooves some form of protection. The majority of horses will benefit from a track system, and if you can provide one with different zones then great. But if you can’t provide the full works then just take away the basic concept and don’t stress.

Which is?

To encourage a horse to walk around their turn out area more, to mimic the natural nomadic lifestyle of wild horses.

Now, if you have your own land, plenty of it, plus plenty of resources to build miles of fencing, then yes, go all out and build the most fantastical track system for your horse to enjoy. Providing different surfaces underfoot, hedgerow and browsing plants, shelter and everything else you’ve ever wanted your horse to have.

But that is the ideal situation.

The majority of us have rented fields with livery yard restrictions, which renders an all singing, all dancing and track system inconceivable. However, like I said, just keeping the core concept of increasing their step count, can really help you manage the weight and general fitness of your horse.

Most paddocks at livery yards are rectangular, and the usual way that people strip graze, or rest half, is to create a “front half” and a “back half” which are effectively squares. Now, what about if you were to turn that around? Instead of putting up temporary fencing across the field, parallel to the short side, what about putting the fence at ninety degrees, parallel to the long side? You then have two rectangles of turnout. The physical area of your horse’s space is the same, but the layout means there’s more walking involved whilst grazing. You can also encourage further movement by putting any hay at the far end of field to the gate and water.

I used this set up for Otis when he was in work, and when I wanted to introduce the rested area, I opened up the fencing at the far end of the field and gave it to him in small chunks. So he’d have to walk the full length of his field, go around the corner and back on himself to get fresh grazing. To rest the first half of the field, I’d just shut the fencing at the far end, and make a gateway near the metal gate. I never had a problem controlling Otis’s weight, but I’m sure it helped keep his baseline fitness up.

Now, with Otis in retirement, we often extend the boys’ paddock into the track, so they get more access to the hedgerow for browsing and have to do a bit more walking to counteract the plentiful grass as exercising him isn’t an option.

When clients talk to me about managing their paddock with the spring grass and tubby pony, I always suggest making the strips of grazing as long and thin (within reason) as possible. If a paddock is rather square, then creating an L shape is a useful way of maximising footfall. Fresh grass can then be given at the far end, eventually creating a C shape. It’s by no means a track system, but it is glorified strip grazing, working within the confines of a standard livery yard set up, and relatively quick and easy to set up and maintain each spring, and hopefully helps reduce the weight gain of the good doers.

Has anyone else found a difference in their horse’s baseline fitness and waistline by changing the configuration of their paddocks?

Floppy Thumbs

With a lot of my teaching I try to come up with catchphrases, so I can say a word to trigger my rider to make a certain correction or check. They often aren’t very technically correct, such as a “squashy trot” for collecting the trot.

This catchphrase has developed over this week due to some recent observations I’ve made, and I think it works quite well.

Most riders don’t carry their hands with the thumbnail pointing vertically up – even if you think you do your thumbs will still point slightly inwards. Now, don’t pretend to hold the reins and say they’re 100% correct, have a look next time you’re in the saddle.

With riders who have the classic “pram pushing” hands with knuckles facing skywards, they often have the elbows sticking out slightly. They may not be flapping like chicken wings, but they will be loose. With loose elbows, the core is weaker and less engaged.

In a nutshell, I find if I tell a rider to put their thumbs on top, I also have 5o tell them to keep the elbows snug to their sides. The two faults are linked.

When I tell a rider to put their thumbs on top there is usually an improvement, but only a 90% improvement at most, and they very quickly let the thumbs flop in slightly.

So I needed a phrase to correct both parts of a rider’s anatomy. The next time you are riding, rotate your hands outwards so that your fingernails point upwards. Can you feel your elbows squeezing against your rib cage? Can you feel your core slightly more engage? No huge clenching of muscles, but your posture and deportment improves.

Yes I agree, riding with your fingers up is a bit extreme, and not very correct, but if you over correct your hands in this way, as soon as your mind drifts to your next circle or change of rein, your hands start to revert. But because of the extreme positioning of the hands, the thumbs end up pointing to the sky, and the elbows snug by your ribs.

Now for the catchphrase. “Flop your thumbs out” seemed to work quite well for my clients this week. It’s short and sweet, draws a smile, no one feels like their being reprimanded, isn’t technical, and gets the desired result.

Now for the core effect. Once my riders have gotten the idea of flopping thumbs, I ask them how their seat and core feels. Often, they don’t notice a thing, so I get them to ride a normal trot-walk transition (with sitting trot beforehand). I haven’t corrected their position or aids for half a lap or so. I ask them how it feels. Then we repeat the transition, but this time I remind them to flop their thumbs out just before taking sitting trot, and then explain how different it feels.

With one rider this week, she noticed a huge change in her balance in the downward transitions, and could feel her core working harder to stabilise her when her elbows were by her side. We took it forwards to the canter transitions, and by the end of the lesson she could feel an ache in her abdomen, which showed she’d worked harder and differently that usual. Like I said earlier, there isn’t a huge visible change to a rider’s torso when flopping their thumbs, but they feel more stable and secure without being tense when the elbows are closed against the ribcage, and it is definitely more noticeable during transitions and sitting trot.

Try it; flop your thumbs out slightly every so often when you’re riding or are about to ride a movement or transition, and see the difference it makes to your balance, stability, and contact.

Leaving Lockdown

It’s been a while since I blogged. Life has been a bit crazy as lockdown has eased and the odd moment that I’ve had to myself I’ve needed to stare vacantly at an insipid TV programme. But there’s no hot water for my bath, so I thought I’d address my oversight whilst waiting for the boiler to do it’s job.

Not that I’m sure what to talk about, so let’s see where this meandering road will take me!

Has anyone else found the idea of coming out of lockdown slightly daunting? Well, very daunting to be honest.

I feel that we’ve slimmed down our diaries to the bare minimum. Essential jobs, outings etc. And realistically are only socialising with who we need to see. Yet we’ve filled our time so that we’re busy every day. How on earth will we fit in anything extra curricular?

Since Easter, I’ve been trying to get a handle on the elusive work-life balance, which has spiralled a bit out of control. We’re back up to three full days of childcare, and I’ve streamlined work into 3.5 weekdays, with Pony Club alternate weekends. Which, once the madness of going on long overdue day trips to visit family calms down, I’m hoping will feel like we have a reset day, and at least a day to do something different; be it a day at the zoo or a walk in the woods.

But then there comes the question as to what we actually want to do with this newfound freedom. I mean, what do we actually want to do? I’ve never been a fan of big crowds, and not having been in one for over a year definitely makes me wary of going out again. I think I’m also concerned about how activities and experiences will change as a result of new regulations and social distancing. I mean, I love going to the West End. But, there’s a lot of people in those narrow passageways, especially during the interval. I feel claustrophobic at the mere thought. And, will the social distancing and mask wearing affect the experience? There’s definitely an element of reluctance to dive straight in. Perhaps I’ll wait until a friend has been so they can feed back to me.

I’ve also been thinking carefully about what options life opening up will give us. And choosing one thing at a time to reintroduce. Even the simple things such as taking Phoenix out. You get out of the rhythm of it, can’t remember what equipment you need, can’t remember how to juggle child and pony. Then factor in the post-lockdown regulations I need to remember. But a few treadmill trips, hacks out with friends and clinics and I’ve refamiliarised myself with Pony adventures. However, the desire to compete hasn’t really returned yet!

Then at the same time I am really conscious of making sure we provide Mallory with stimulation, opportunities, and an education. But without creating a whirlwind lifestyle. This week, we started officially sharing a lovely Welsh section A pony. We’ll only go once a week, and I’ll follow her lead as to whether we hack (current favourite), trot around the arena (“don’t hold me Mum. I don’t need you to hold her!”), or meander over poles. Then we’re also eagerly awaiting for swimming pools to be opened for public swimming so we can make the water baby happy again and get her confident in the water again.

I’ve booked a slot to go trampolining next week; an activity that we loved before lockdown, but decided that we won’t return to her singing and dancing class until things get back to normal in terms of interaction because neither of us enjoyed the individual island like experience of before Christmas and I spent the entire time telling her not to interact with the other children. And otherwise, we’ll just hand pick activities on a weekly basis until we find the right balance for us.

I think emerging from this hibernation steadily will give us all chance to adapt, yet also make the decision as to what we actually want to do rather than being swept along with the crowd and overburdened with a hectic schedule, leaving us no time for the quiet, quality moments we’ve learnt to appreciate over the last fourteen months.

Sacroiliac Injuries

For some reason, I have three horses on my books currently rehabbing from sacroiliac injuries. One fell over in the field being moronic. Another, actually another did his in the field when he arrived at a new yard. And another has come to me for help after a year of battling with SI problems.

Not that I’ve become an expert, but I’ve definitely picked up a few nuggets of information about sacroiliac injuries and rehabilitation.

Symptoms of a sacroiliac injury aren’t particularly obvious – there’s no limpy leg. There is often a positive reaction to palpitation of the SI area (and by positive, I mean that the horse reacts to pressure, even in an ears back, angry way). Although some horses can be incredibly stoic and barely flinch when palpated. There’s slight shortening of the hindlimb stride, usually both, but many riders won’t notice it. I’d almost describe it as a “flat” movement. They’re going through the motions of moving their legs, but are saving themselves and not using their back muscles. Mostly, horses show unhappiness in the canter – bucking, going disunited, falling out of canter and general reluctance. A horse may find jumping harder, put in the odd refusal, or not bascule as well as normal. I think often sacroiliac injuries are noticed after a period of time, when the horse’s posture and muscle definition have deteriorated so that the saddle doesn’t fit, or the physiotherapist notices a change in posture.

The usual treatment for a sacroiliac injury is to medicate the joint, and then a rehabilitation programme to stabilise and strengthen the area. The medication lasts for six months, so there’s a good stretch of time to build up the work and improve their way of going without the horse being in pain, and then hopefully once the six months is over the SI area is strong, stable and pain free.

Vets usually recommend two weeks of box rest and then a six week rehab programme working up to introducing canter in the last fortnight. I always find that the typical vet’s programme is quite ambitious and based on the perfect scenario of seven days a week and a perfectly behaved pony in the field! If you can only work the horse five days a week, stretch out the rehab programme to factor this in. If the weather’s awful or you’ve been ill and haven’t progressed through the week, then just repeat that week of the rehab programme. My vet friend told me that the worst thing you can do when rehabbing a sacroiliac injury is to work a horse more than their fitness. So I work on the basis that if in doubt, plateau the work load for a few days and take more time. Besides, the owner usually knows their horse very well so can tell if their horse is ready for the next step of the rehabilitation programme, or if they need more time at their current stage to build their strength.

The first couple of weeks of the rehab programme is walk only. Long reining is often recommended, and hugely beneficial as the horse starts to work in a long and low frame without the weight of the rider. The horses that I’ve worked with this year have both done at least a week of pure long reining; in the arena and out on little hacks. Then we’ve introduced walk poles on the long reins and then riding. Initially, it’s been a ride every three days, and then after another week or so, alternating riding and long reining. The poles start off as only one or two every other day, to more poles, then more frequently, and then raising the poles. We make the workload harder by one factor at a time so as to develop the horse’s strength steadily. Again, if the horse seems to find it difficult then they can have an easier following couple of days, perhaps going back to just walking with no polework. We also introduced hillwork on hacks, again with small hills, and then steeper hills and more frequently in each week.

The first long reining session, where stretching long and low is quite an alien concept.
Within the first long reining session, this horse started experimenting with moving his head into different positions. Within a fortnight he stretched for the majority of his time in a long and low frame.

After two or three weeks of walking, we introduce trot in straight lines. On the long reins and under saddle. With the same approach – introduce the trot without the weight of the rider, then under saddle, then increase the number of trots, the duration of the trots, adding in polework and then hillwork. If the horse ends up feeling particularly tired when a new level is introduced, such as trotting up a hill, then the next day they can do slightly less. I like to maintain long reining a couple of days a week, and vary the work so that the horse’s brain is engaged and they don’t become bored.

Once the horse is feeling strong enough – I go on the basis that they should find three or more raised trot poles straightforward, and have their neck low, back lifting throughout – then it’s time for canter.

The day of the first canters I’m not worried about the transitions, I’m just looking for the horse to feel comfortable in the canter; and for it to be fairly rhythmical and three time. One or two canters on each rein is sufficient the first time, and the following day have an easy ride or long rein session. Once canter has been introduced I don’t think it’s necessary to canter the horse daily over the first week or so. Canter is the hardest gait for horses with sacroiliac injuries, so introducing it very slowly and steadily minimises the horse regressing or overdoing it. In the canter the horse’s pelvis moves in more of a sideways motion, whilst in the trot it’s a forwards-backwards motion so there’s new muscles being recruited and needing to strengthen. The whole pelvic area should also become more supple after canter is introduced and the horse begin to feel much more comfortable trotting in a long and low frame, with the back swinging nicely.

At this stage, whether it’s taken six weeks or ten weeks, the basic rehab programme from the vets is essentially over. But that doesn’t mean it’s back to pre-injury work. Especially if the pre-injury workload caused the injury. Time needs to be spent on the canter, getting the horse to better use their back and develop the muscles over the sacroiliac area, using canter poles, both on the ground and raised, before recommencing jumping. Realistically, it’s another month before the horse is back at their usual level of work and able to stay sound.

I find it really satisfying rehabbing horses, and enjoy reflecting on the changes to their posture, muscle tone and way of going. Although I don’t think I’d have the patience I have with client’s horses with my own!

Sensitive Subjects

This is a subject I’m coming across more and more, as well as it increasingly coming to the forefront of coach training.

It’s a delicate subject, and I think one which is handled by many parents in such different ways, which I’ll explain in a moment. But I also think it’s important to see and understand a coach’s perspective. It’s taken me a few days to work out what the purpose of my blog is, and how best to phrase it.

Firstly, what on earth am I banging on about? I’m talking about riders with additional needs. Be it a physical limitation, a learning difficulty, dyspraxia, being on the autistic spectrum, etc etc. And the point that I’m trying to make is that a coach needs to be told of any additional needs so that they can create a safe teaching and riding environment, complete appropriate risk assessments, as well as planning appropriate lesson content. It’s a subject that should be talked about without the taboo or fear of stigma.

There are two extremes of parents that I come across on this subject. Those who will tell me before the first lesson an extensive list of difficulties their child encounters when being taught. And those who don’t admit that there are any differences in their child from society’s typical idea of “normal”. And no, we won’t go down the rabbit hole of what defines normal.

I think the reason some parents don’t tell about their child’s differences is because of the perceived stigma attached and they’re concerned that their child will be treated differently.

But, the thing is, that in order to teach a child with disabilities you do need to treat them differently. In the positive sense. A teacher may need to adapt their explanation, or allow more time, or use a different teaching method, to help that particular child understand. For example, a person who is wired slightly differently, needs a different sort of explanation to help them understand. In the same way a French speaker will understand an explanation in French far more than an explanation in English. And if you have a group of fluent English speakers, and one French speaker with limited understanding of English. It is a poor teaching approach to just teach in English, ostracising the French speaker; a good teacher will incorporate French in their teaching in order to be inclusive.

Teachers and coaches need to be multi lingual and be able to teach so that the different learning styles are accommodated. In which case, it’s helpful for a coach to have some inside information about any student with learning difficulties so that they can best plan and structure their lessons.

I`ve often had lessons where I`ve been trying to teach a concept, and ultimately failing, coming up with Plan B or racking my brains for alternative explanations. Then, at the end, I`m informed by the parent that the rider has a physical limitation, or doesn`t compute whatever approach I’m using. At which point I’m internally frustrated, and the rider showing signs that they’re equally frustrated. This is when it would be useful to have had insider knowledge so I could go straight to Plan C and get it right first time. There’s no judgement from my side as I want to be able to get my message across and help my rider improve from the off.

However… I do find that being told too much detail on the first lesson actually clouds my assessment of a rider. A few weeks ago I taught a one off lesson (long story), and was fully briefed by the Mum about the rider’s way of learning and processing information. I actually felt more pressure from all this insider knowledge that I overthought my lesson. Within minutes of meeting the rider and watching her ride, I disregarded most of the information from her Mum. Not because it was unimportant, but because I didn’t need to bear it in mind. Let me explain better. I was told that this rider struggled to retain lots of information and tended to switch off. Which is fine. But my teaching style is much more bitesize. Do an exercise or movement, talk about one part of it. Improve that. Do another exercise, focus on another area, be it improving the rider’s riding, or discussing the biomechanics and feel. I understand why the Mum wanted to tell me this nugget of information, because if I were a lecturing type of instructor, the rider would have struggled to retain the lesson.

So what’s the answer?

To be honest, I’m not sure, and I think it depends on the individual and what is being taught. Horse riding is physical, so actually it’s useful to know of any previous injuries, weaker limbs (from breaks etc), or poor core strength. Often I’ll make the observations, but equally it’s useful to know that there’s a reason for asymmetry, or if they’ll find it difficult to achieve my corrections, rather than bad habits.

In terms of the non physical differences, it can be harder for a coach to understand or identify them, which is where I think it’s down to the parent to inform the coach of anything on a need to know basis; whether it be a personal quirk, undiagnosed suspicion or a clinical diagnosis. I.e. In the stable management sessions, doing quizzes, it is relevant to know about them and their dyslexia. But it’s not as relevant in their ridden sessions. I also find it useful to know of any behavioural triggers when teaching. Firstly, so I can avoid triggering them, and secondly so that I’m not caught off guard, and thirdly so I’m not offended, or feel like I’ve failed in my teaching.

It’s a very sensitive subject which needs to have the stigma removed from it, and for everyone to understand that someone with additional learning, whether it has a label or diagnosis or is just their individuality, needs does need to be treated slightly differently in order to be able to learn. Sure, it’s discrimination, but it’s not exclusion. If anything, being ignorant to a person’s needs and being unable to help them leads to them being isolated and ultimately excluded from the main group.

I’d be interested to hear the viewpoints of parents on finding the balance of what to tell riding coaches about their child, and their experiences in this area, because it’s definitely an area which we can improve on, to better a rider’s experience of learning to ride and improving an instructor’s skill set.

Opening Up The Thighs

In my weekly pilates class we’ve been doing a lot of stretches to open up the front of the hips – muscles which become tight when sat at a desk all day and subsequently prevent you from sitting upright and having the long leg desired in the dressage arena.

I’ve made a few observations over recent months about adjusting stirrups, which link into these exercises.

Let me explain.

When I was a teenager helping at the local riding school and had to adjust a client’s stirrup length, we would ask them to take their foot out of the iron and swing their leg back. Then you can access the buckle at the front of their thigh. There’s also no weight on the skirt of the saddle and you can see what you’re doing, so it’s a straightforward adjustment. I didn’t think much of it, apart from the occasional beginner or mature adult who was a bit stiff the first few times.

Fast forward almost two decades (when did I get so OLD?!) and now anytime I see anyone having assistance to adjust their stirrup length, brings their leg forward, akin to adjusting the girth. Why has this trend changed? Or maybe the leg back approach was just a Welsh thing… Perhaps our increasingly sedentary lifestyles has made us all stiffer in the hips?

Anyway, let’s not go down the route of discussing keeping the foot in the stirrup whilst adjusting the leathers, because that technique actually helps stretch out the inner thigh (one of the reasons many people struggle to use this technique if not brought up with it). We’re talking about assisted stirrup adjustments.

Based on my observations, that riders prefer to draw the leg forward to make adjustments, and the fact that many leisure riders find it difficult to ride with a long leg, either relying on knee rolls to hold their leg in the correct position or pitching forwards at the seat. Or both.

Linking back to pilates; when we prepare to ride and do some leg stretches, or when we do leg stretches in the saddle whilst first walking around, should we also be considering how we adjust the stirrups, using any adjustments as an opportunity to stretch out the front of the hips?

It would be interesting to do a study with those riders who usually move the leg forward when stirrups are adjusted, and instead get them to move their leg back each time they ride and adjust the stirrups. Over the course of a few weeks, do they find this movement easier, and does their seat and leg position improve? Then, how much effect do the pilates stretches have on seat and leg position if done before every ride?

Food for thought…

Otis Update

I thought you’d all like an update on Otis.

He’s come through the winter nicely, although dropped a little bit of weight in the last month since his rug has been off, but I’m happy with that as he needs to be a little slim in spring so I don’t have to reduce grazing or anything. It’s not like he can be exercised to remove excess weight!

He’s still hairy, although that’s rapidly falling out of him. He’s very happy, still a little limpy in trot, but it doesn’t stop him cantering over for breakfast!

What I have enjoyed seeing these last couple of months is his relationship developing with Mallory. We always knew he was a gentle, sensitive soul. One who just rests his head against you and absorbs all your problems. Who calms you with a blink of his large, brown eye. But recently it’s become even more evident.

I bring him out of the paddock to feed as his field mate practically inhales his food and Otis’s is yummier, so it’s easier to separate them. I leave Mallory sat in the barrow, on top of the hay while I put the buckets down. Usually singing “postman pat and his black and white cat… Just as day is dawning, he picks up all the postmen in his van” because she’s delivering the horse’s food.

Then we take the barrow into the field, lift her out, and empty the hay. As I’m doing this she usually runs back to Otis, hugs his head (which isn’t much smaller than her whole body), tells him she loves him, and then turns his bucket upside down before giving it back to me, whether it’s empty or not. He just stands there, lapping up the attention, and carefully moving towards the bucket when she’s out the way.

His gentleness is paying off though, as any banana skins or apple cores are specifically requested to go to Otis now. But I love how tolerant he is of her, and how he’s teaching her how to treat others, whilst letting her express her feelings and childlike tendencies – carefully laying her favourite comforter over him, clapping, giggling in joy as she sits on him bareback, usually backwards, spinning Around the World regularly to change her view.

Phoenix’s Hydrotherapy

I’ve recently been managing, well surviving, Phoenix in winter mode. She’s not as hyped as previous winters, and kept a lid on herself until February. Hopefully by the time she’s twenty she’ll be cool as a cucumber over winter!

Sure, she was a bit fizzy, but a good canter took the edge off. Then, a new horse went into the adjacent field, so Phoenix spent the next couple of days charging at the fence line defending her territory and herd. When I rode her she was super tense and tight over the lumbar area of her back.

So I booked her in with the chiropractor pronto, who found a slight misalignment but mostly tight muscles. About the same time, Phoenix had her first season of the year, and seemed even more sore in her lumbar, which I can only put down to period pains as it’s fairly close to her ovaries. She also had a massage the following week and definitely felt looser in that area afterwards.

Phoenix’s biggest issue when she gets a sore spot is that we then have a mental block about it. For example, this time the tension in her lumbar area caused her to almost wince when asked to bring her right hind slightly further under her body – travers, right canter, leg yield. Which then sends me down a rabbit hole as to whether there’s an underlying issue…

However, after some stretches which showed full range of movement, just moving with caution, and some lunging in just a cavesson proved that there’s nothing physically wrong, just her suspicions that it will hurt, combined with the need to canter in a straight line for several miles to burn off the excess energy. Similar to many kids coming out of lockdown!

Which means that I’m now schooling to loosen up her lumbar, getting it to work correctly, and making her realise that it doesn’t hurt and to relax into her work again. Which she’s starting to do after some canter work. The better weather is also helping and I’m pleased with her work at the end of the last few schooling sessions. They feel progressive again.

While all this has been going on, I had had thoughts about boxing her the five miles to use the water treadmill. Hydrotherapy is a very good workout for their core and my initial plan, to try and keep winter Phoenix in her box next year, is to take her weekly to the treadmill over the worse of the winter months. It’s another form of exercise; when the weather is bad riding is a calorie burning exercise rather than being particularly beneficial to her way of going, so this would take the pressure off me to ride her on wet and windy days, hopefully keep the energy levels in check, and help keep her topline (which unfortunately has deteriorated this last 6 weeks while she’s been tense and reluctant to use her back properly). I felt guilty at the thought of travelling her during lockdown as whilst travelling for hydrotherapy is permitted, Phoenix wasn’t exactly in dire need of it.

Phoenix took to the treadmill happily, walking straight on, although the look in her face when it started and she shot backwards was a picture! It was interesting watching Phoenix’s lumbar muscles begin to work over the course of the treadmill session, starting a little locked but by the end her whole back was swinging nicely.

I’m not expecting a huge transformation in her physique as a result of going on the treadmill. This month of sessions is to help get her using her back again and feeling stronger. In the summer I can work her correctly easily and get her long and low (which is not natural or easy for her, like stretching out a strong spring which likes to be on alert) but now she’s experienced the treadmill she will be ready for the winter, when she comes weekly and hopefully we have a more constructive training programme. As well as the fact we will hopefully be allowed out competing and to blow off steam on the gallops.

Roll on spring!

A Journey

Buying a horse isn’t like buying a car. You may like the test drive, but unlike a car (unless it’s a second hand car sold by Harry Wormwood) you are only beginning the journey. A new horse will be affected by changes to his environment, diet, tack, routine, and needs to build a relationship with their new owner. The first few months are always a journey, and I get such satisfaction seeing a pair coming together and developing a relationship, especially if I’ve been involved in the purchasing process.

In October a friend and client bought a little cob. Emphasis on the little. He’s only about 13.2hh, but is wider than he is tall, so easily carries a small adult. He hadn’t done much in his previous home, but is a safe and sensible leg at each corner type.

We started by gentle schooling and hacking, to build his fitness. Poles and little jumps as necessary. He also had the usual checks and changes – saddle check, chiropractor, clip etc. In hindsight, we probably rushed this process, as he was quiet and accepting but in reality they were all new experiences for him. He had a new saddle within weeks, we changed the bit to discourage him from going behind the vertical, he was fully clipped.

Then he started broncing. Not the odd buck, but head between the knees, coiled like a spring, and not what he appeared to be when he arrived. We stripped everything back to how he came (with the exception of his clip), and came to the conclusion over Christmas that his cheeky behaviour was a combination of being stabled for the first time in his life, being a little too attached to his neighbour, and being clipped – his behaviour was better on calm, milder days. He also had his teeth rasped in January, which were definitely overdue so that was possibly a contributing factor.

Unfortunately, you can’t stick hair back on, so we’ve had to ride out the freshness, and let the clip regrow. He definitely doesn’t like being completely naked so in the autumn, he can just have a blanket clip, which I think will be better suited to his work load and living out.

The last three months have been a steady progression of building his confidence out hacking, having him shod because he got a little footsore, and encouraging him to lengthen his compact little frame.

I’ve been really pleased with his and his owners progress. They’re developing a strong relationship, he’s working nicely for both her and me. He feels stronger in the school. Right canter was non-existent and left very unbalanced, but now we get right canter more often than left and both are three time and rhythmical. Below are two photos to show the difference in the pony’s posture and condition. His neck has muscled up nicely and his short back has become strong, with toned hindquarters. He’s a curvaceous type so will never look like an event horse, but he’s definitely more muscle than fat now.

It’s not been the fastest or smoothest transformation, but the pair have a solid foundation for the next few months as we look at sponsored rides, more jumping, and maybe some online dressage tests…