Dressage for Juniors

Back in the summer I blogged about judging the Pony Club dressage at camp, and how difficult I felt the basic test was for young children, and perhaps that if the Pony Club did some simple tests aimed at young children it might encourage a higher standard of flatwork, and nurture an interest in dressage from an early age. You can read that post here.

Over the summer I saw some lead rein intro dressage classes, which seemed really popular. With the young riders anyway. I think the leaders just needed oxygen because the BD intro tests have a lot of trotting in! I did see that a couple of venues made their own lead rein tests as a result of leader feedback.

Then, I heard of this online business which runs monthly competitions, called Equi-Mind. I had a good nosey on the website, and decided that it was definitely worth following up.

Last year I did a couple of online dressage competitions, which is where you video a set test from the letter C and send it in. Unfortunately, that company folded.

Equi-mind, is actually fairly local to me, which gives me another reason to support them – local businesses and all that. Anyway, they have a variety of competitions to suit almost anyone who can`t or don’t want to go off site competing.

There are showing classes, where you video a short show and send in some photos. Entrants are judged according to the class requirements – best turned out, native class, ROR etc. There`s Western classes, vaulting classes, RDA classes, Horsemanship classes and dressage classes.

Then, I spotted another category which really caught my attention – My First Pony Club. This is aimed at novice and young children. Perhaps those who loan a pony, or don`t have access to transport, or don’t have horsey parents. There are a couple of levels of these tests in walk and trot. I`m waiting for a canter test to appear. The tests can be ridden on or off the lead, and are very straightforward. The focus on the tests is riding between markers, using the whole of the arena, keeping the walk or trot rhythm. There are some circles, but I find that children find it very difficult to visualise and ride a round circle of a particular size, so often movements from letter to letter are more achievable for them. The whole point of the tests, to me anyway, is to introduce the first scale of training – rhythm – and to test their ability to accurately steer their pony.

I liked these tests; they weren`t too long for leaders, and weren’t too daunting for young riders to try on their own. They also struck me as being easy to teach a child the test, and straightforward to feedback to them.

A couple of weeks later I had a young rider who had badly lost her confidence jumping, so I suggested we tried one of these dressage tests. I wanted to give her a new focus, and I`ve always thought she has the right aptitude for dressage – an eye for detail, a lovely position, and a mature understanding of the way a horse moves and feel for the correct way of going. She can canter quite happily, but the fact that the dressage test was walk and trot meant that even when she was feeling wobbly, she was still happy to give it a go.

We used one of her lessons to introduce the idea of dressage tests, and for her to start getting her head around movements, before videoing the test the following week. I thought it looked pretty good – she was accurate and being a tidy rider anyway they gave a good overall impression, but I wasn`t really sure what the judges were particularly looking for.

Much to my delight, and her surprise, she won that class with 65%. It was the much needed confidence boost that she needed. I`d like to get her doing an intro class soon, with more trotting and circles, but it would be nice to see a couple more tests in the My First Pony Club category which are slightly harder than the one they did, but still easily understood by children. Perhaps a couple more changes of rein or transitions, or a couple of 20m circles?

There were also some horsemanship tests designed for children, which I thought looked fun. In these, you video the child doing a series of tasks such as putting on a headcollar correctly, tying a quick release knot, leading their pony, picking out feet, giving their pony a treat from the palm of their hand. All useful little tasks which are achievable by the smallest of riders, and designed to encourage them to get involved in the care side of horse riding.

I have to say that I`ve been impressed with the support from Equi-mind, with the clear feedback given after the classes, and the instructions for entering. Check out their website, http://www.equimind.co.uk/ , and see if there`s a class for you to enter for a bit of fun. I sent off a photo of Otis jumping for the Jump in Style photo competition to get some feedback, whilst I was doing some reminiscing and grieving for the fact I`ll never jump him again.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s