Low, Deep and Round

It was good to see this statement from the BHS bigwigs about the importance of seeing the full picture before castigating riders.

Yes I know, rolkur is an issue and should not be permitted or encouraged in anyway. But so often you see photos of professionals, dressage riders in particular, being slated because the horse is behind the vertical or tight in the neck.

We’ve all had those horrendous photos taken, where you’re making a face, or look fat because it’s the wrong angle or whatever other sensitive issue you may have. A photo is a moment in time and can just as easily show off a horse at their worst, than at their best. I just wish the keyboard warriors would firstly accept that professionals competing at a high standard, such as Olympia, deserve some respect and are probably significantly better horsemen than the said warriors. Also, keyboard warriors should look at the whole situation and use their own brain to analyse whether the horse is being incorrectly ridden, or if the photo captured them at the wrong moment.

The media can also be to blame. A negative photo that is sensationalised sells magazines far more than a standard photo of good riding.

I remember being told that the head and neck are the last thing to fall into place when training a horse. I think I blogged recently about it … Not so much about the subject itself, but rather how the frame of a horse will alter through training.

Anyway, I always teach my clients about riding to the steady contact and working on what the hind legs and body are doing, rather than the head. Then the head takes care of itself. Sometimes I’ll say that the horse is dropping behind the vertical, or their poll is getting too low, but we then correct them by putting in some impulsion, or correcting the hand carriage. Whatever needs to be done to help the horse regain self carriage.

I have a couple of clients who, with a photo taken at the wrong moment would have a horse behind the vertical. And it’s most definitely not from them being restrictive with their hands and riding badly. One pony gets tense and finds it hard to maintain a consistent contact, so tucks his nose back, looking behind the bit and tight in the neck. Once he’s found the contact, his rider just squeezes the legs to encourage him to step out towards the contact and then he lengthens his neck and corrects his head.

Another horse often goes poll low, and that’s where she lacks impulsion and is conformationally built a bit on the forehand. As soon as she starts to drop down and onto the forehand we ride some transitions and input impulsion to activate her hindquarters so she comes up off the forehand, creating a much prettier and more correct picture.

The youngster I’m working with at the moment spends most of his time above the bridle, but we are focusing on rhythm to the trot, steering and suppling him, and ensuring he holds a steady and even rein contact. His head carriage, whilst more accepted than being behind the vertical, will improve as he establishes his balance and learns to maintain it.

The weak horse in the blog I’ve linked to, is now much stronger, and is starting to carry herself better, and is learning to stretch in the trot, and free walk on a long rein, so presents a far more correct frame, but when she gets tired, or loses her balance she still has moments of dropping behind the vertical as she momentarily balances on her rider’s hand before carrying herself again.

I think it’s so important for coaches to understand, and to explain to riders the importance or the studying the whole package of riding, and how the horse’s stage of training and physical appearance will affect their ability to carry their nose on the vertical with their poll at the highest point, before judging others and when planning their own training and improvement.

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