Lunging Gadgets

I asked a couple of weeks ago for any requests for blog subjects, as I’m trying to write a few in preparation for having my hands full. Plus it’s a useful occupation whilst lying on the sofa and stops me googling too many inane questions about babies.

One request was a continuation of a conversation I’d had with a client about lunging aids. Or gadgets. How do you know which one your horse needs, or doesn’t need. Or if they need any at all.

I think I’ve said before, that whilst I feel lunging aids have a use and can be very beneficial to a horse, they can just as easily cause more harm than good by being adjusted incorrectly or with a poor lunging technique.

Firstly, when deciding on which lunging aid you’re going to try, I think it’s important to reflect on how the horse goes when ridden, and if there’s any issues there which need resolving before you start a lunging program, or indeed if there’s any area under saddle which would benefit from being worked on on the lunge. Then it’s useful to see the horse on the lunge, to make sure they understand the basic concept, and are relaxed and focused on the aids, before adding the complication of a gadget. Thirdly, speak to your instructor about it. They may have more experience of a lunging aid so be able to help you fit it and use it correctly, as well as advise to how often you should use it. Lunging, whilst a useful way to burn some extra calories, should supplement the ridden work. So if your horse will work long and low on their own accord on the lunge, find their balance and self carriage then you don’t need a gadget as such, just some exercises such as spiralling in or pole work to help improve their work under saddle. But for some horses, they need some help to point them in the right direction of self-carriage, balance and working long and low.

Finally, critique your own ability – easier said than done – about lunging. Are you able to influence the way a horse goes through body language? In which case do you actually need any more than a lunge cavesson to improve your horse’s way of going or would some lessons and good old practice suffice?

Lunging aids, such as a bungee or side reins, focus on the front of the horse so I feel that if you decide to go down that route then the lungee needs to be able to efficiently send the horse forwards from behind, and the horse respond appropriately without tensing or rushing, in order to use these gadgets correctly. A Pessoa, or Equi-Ami, or any other whole body gadget, will work on both the front and back ends, which so long as they are fitted correctly, require the lungee to do less technical work. Which may explain their popularity, in that they don’t need quite so much skill in order to see an improvement in your horse.

Here are a couple of examples of horses that I’ve lunged, and which lunging aid I’ve opted to use to help improve their way of going.

Firstly, is a pony who tends to drift through his right shoulder. When ridden straight, he’s fine, it’s just a technique he’s developed to make his life easier. Now in lessons, I’ve spent a lot of time straightening and evening out his riders rein contact (her left hand tends to fix whilst the right hand drifts forward constantly, so enabling the pony to go crooked). It’s a bit of a vicious circle in that neither are truly straight, so to help correct the pony, I suggested he was lunged in side reins. This would give him an even contact in his mouth, help teach him not to fall through the right shoulder, and improve his straightness because he would have to engage his left hindleg under his body. He also likes to tuck behind the bit, so his rider can see for herself how he starts to take the contact forwards when driven on from behind and straight. This will help her understand that she needs to use more leg and seat to push the pony into the contact, whilst stabilising the hands, and she will be able to visualise the results. Lunging in side reins once a week will help break the cycle because the pony will become straighter and then my rider will feel the effects of her wobbly right hand and more easily get the correct result when she corrects herself.

One mare that I lunge tends to get tight in her neck, and lock her back. She looks active enough, but it’s just the legs pedalling as fast as possible whilst the back stays as still as a duck serenely floating along the river. When you ride her she likes a contact, but it mustn’t be restrictive, and you must be riding her quietly from behind so that she goes forwards without getting tense. She’s the classic example of the benefit of riding from the back to the front of the horse, rather than pinning the front end in. Anyway, when using side reins, she stiffens her neck, lifts her head and goes behind the contact. Sending her on, when lunging, just makes her paddle quicker with the legs as she rushes. She needs more encouragement to release over her back and to drop her nose forwards and down. So I put her in the Pessoa. The strap behind her hindquarters sends her on from behind, without the lungee flapping and worrying the mare into tension. It mimics the “riding from the back to the front” adage. The clips to her bit and between her front legs should not be too tight, because she will just tense and contract her neck instead of seeking the contact forwards. These clips will also put pressure on her bit to encourage her to lower her head as that’s where she’ll feel the release of pressure. After lunging her a couple of times like this, she stopped getting tense when the Pessoa was attached, and immediately took herself into a long and low position, swinging nicely over her back. Teaching her to work over her back without the interference of a rider and their balance will pay huge dividends under saddle. After a couple of months lunging like this, I’d expect to see her stretching long and low in her warm up on the lunge, which then means you can lunge naked, which will encourage more self-carriage, or use a different technique or exercise to help strengthen another area of her body.

Another horse I’ve been working on is quite short coupled and easily over tracks. In fact, in walk his hind feet over step his the prints left by his forefeet by an easy two lengths. Under saddle, the horse can throw himself out through the outside shoulder to evade bending through his rib cage. He can get a bit tight under the saddle and at the base of the neck, so would benefit from stretching on the lunge. However, because he’s at risk of over reaching due to his conformation I think the Pessoa will hurry his hindquarters too much. No you don’t want to ride from hand to leg, but I think the lungee can influence the hindquarters sufficiently with this horse that his engine will work without the pressure of the back strap. I decided to use side reins, on a fairly long setting so that the horse is encouraged to lengthen his neck as he seeks the contact. The side reins also help prevent the horse evading through his shoulders. Then whilst lunging him I can work on sending him forwards so he works with the right amount of impulsion and then he will seek the contact of the side reins for himself and develop self carriage.

Another horse I teach with lacks impulsion and can be very lazy with her hindquarters. Whilst she uses crookedness to evade her rider’s aids, I feel that the first port of call with her on the lunge is to activate her hindquarters. In order that she doesn’t rush and shuffle off, but instead lengthens the stride and pushes with the hindlegs, the lungee needs to be able to maintain some tension down the lunge line whilst also using their body and the lunge whip to drive the mare forwards. This takes a bit of skill, so her owners actually need the help of a well fitting gadget around her hindquarters to support them in sending her forwards. For this reason I suggested they tried using the Pessoa. Perhaps once they’ve developed their skill and become more adept with the lunge line and whip, and the mare is more forwards, they could move on to the side reins to assist with the straightness and help establish the outside rein contact.

You may have noticed that I only really use the side reins or a Pessoa. I’ve experienced other gadgets, especially when lunging a horse in rehab for their owners but I’m not fully familiar with them or completely satisfied with the hows and why’s they work, so prefer to use a tool that I’m confident with, and then if it’s not having the effect I imagined it to, I’ll do more research into other options. Something about not being a jack of all trades and master of none!

When going down the route of lunging to improve your horse’s way of going I always advocate having a couple of lessons, to improve your technique, and to ensure the lunging aid is fitted correctly and is benefiting your horse, and what exercises you can do on the lunge. And if your instructor doesn’t know how the gadget you want to try works, then see if another instructor in your area does who can offer advice. Perhaps this is a gap in the market? To offer lunge clinics, which teach owners the correct basic technique, and also demonstrate the correct use and fitting of such lunging aids.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s