Linking Lunging to Ridden Work

Mum and Matt had boot camp again this weekend, and we spent some time improving Mum’s ability to relate lunging Matt to schooling him. I find it’s a common problem for horse owners. They have their ridden aims, but their lunge sessions rarely compliment them.

Let me explain.

Mum has been working on Matt’s trot; getting him to be more active behind, engaging his hindquarters and lightening his forehand, then maintaining self-carriage.

Mainly, we were working on her half halts to rebalance Matt. So when he drops on the forehand she half halts with the seat and outside rein whilst almost simultaneously closing the leg and driving him forwards.

We also worked on the concept of riding Matt from leg to hand. That means preparing Matt with a teeny half halt before using the leg and seat to send him forwards from the hindquarters up into her hand then to allow him forwards as he goes into the contact.

Matt is lazy and can drop behind the bridle very easily as he switches off, so it’s important for Mum to send him forwards into the contact. Yet as with many lazy horses, it’s easy to drop the contact so that there’s no hint of a brake on. Again, as with many lazy horses, Matt actually works more actively when he has the security of a light contact to give him confidence. So we spent a lot of time working on the concept of riding Matt between leg and hand, and riding him from behind, whilst keeping a steady contact.

After two sessions they were improving; Mum was straighter in her position and keeping more of a symmetrical, consistent contact; getting a more active trot by riding Matt from leg to hand in the transitions, and could feel Matt was less on the forehand, more engaged, and in self carriage, working over his back.

Mum lunges Matt frequently, but after saying last time I was in Wales that Matt “never goes like that” when she lunges him, I thought she needed a revision session to help.

Of course, Mum knows how to hold all the equipment and can lunge to exercise Matt, but now we need to move on to lunging to improve Matt.

Firstly, I explained how the lunge line is the lunge equivalent of the rein contact. You can half halt through it, monitor the tempo, and improve the balance of the horse.

The voice and lunge whip are the leg aid replacements when lunging. So by considering these aids in relation to ridden work, Mum managed to get Matt to work from behind and then go forwards into the contact by keeping the lunge line a bit tighter and utilising half halts before sending Matt forwards from the whip and voice, which meant that he effectively lunged from leg to hand. This meant that the Pessoa was helping to improve Matt. Unless a horse steps forward from behind and goes into the contact then the Pessoa is useless and they just work in a hollow fashion. Once Matt became more active with his hindquarters he lifted his withers and stretched over his back. Then by half halting and driving him forwards she could stop him dropping onto the forehand, and keep the trot consistent and in balance.

Once Mum had established the trot so that it was as good as her ridden trot work, we looked at improving it further. In the same way that she would when riding. I laid out some trotting poles and Mum sent Matt over them, focusing on keeping him straight, maintaining momentum, and him staying round and not hollowing over the poles. As when you ride, the poles improve the length of stride, cadence and engagement of the horse. When Mum’s more practiced lunging over poles and Matt is stronger she can lengthen the distance between the poles and raise them to further Matt’s suppleness and balance.

Using transitions on the lunge, between the gaits and within the gait, so long as Mum has a contact with the lunge line, will ensure Matt pushes from behind more, as well as helping improve his balance so he’s working over his top line and improves in consistency. I think it will also help improve her eye as she can see what a good trot looks like and equate that to what she feels in the saddle.

Matt tends to fall in on the right rein, and when she’s riding Mum has the naughty habit of pulling him out with the left (outside) rein. I nagged her about using the right leg to push him out rather than using her left hand. He does the same on the lunge, so I got Mum to push Matt back out on the lunge by waving the lunge whip at his shoulder. After doing this a couple of times, I noticed on the lunge that Matt was straighter on the right rein and maintaining the correct bend. Hopefully Mum will feel this reflected in her ridden work and she’ll find it easier to keep him straight on the right rein and will be less likely to resort to her bad habits.

By considering her ridden aims when lunging Matt, Mum should find that she can use her work with the Pessoa and on the ground to improve his way of going which will help Matt develop his topline and become consistent in both his work ethic and way of going.

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