A Staircase

I did this little gymnastic exercise with a pony and rider last week. The pony has a strong shoulder and on the penultimate stride to fences drops his forehand, which isn’t a huge problem at the lower levels, but now the jumps have started getting bigger we’ve noticed he isn’t jumping so cleanly. When the pony drops onto his forehand, he unbalances his rider so he collapses through his core and gets in front of the movement.

I’ve done a lot of grid and pole exercises with the pair to help break this habit. Last week’s exercise built on the bounce grid from last week.

I laid out four canter poles, nine foot apart, and had the boys cantering steadily over the poles, checking that they maintained their rhythm and didn’t rush. Because we’re working on the pony not dropping his forehand in front of the fence I’ve been using short distances with them. This encourages the pony to stay uphill in the canter and to sit on his hindquarters, which helps improve their jumping technique.

With the canter starting to improve just over the poles I made the last pole into an upright, about a foot high. So it was more of a raised pole, but because I hadn’t adjusted the distance the pony had to adjust his canter in order to increase his bascule over the raised pole.

Next, I made the third pole into a foot high upright, and raised the fourth pole to about two foot high.

We progressively increased the heights of the poles until the second pole was eighteen inches high, the third pole roughly two foot three and the fourth pole approximately two foot nine.

The first pole acted as a placing pole, still nine foot from the second pole. I didn’t need to alter the distance between the second and third poles, but I did lengthen the distance between the third and fourth jumps so that it was a generous ten foot. This is closer to a bounce distance, and the pony needed more space between the bigger fences.

The purpose of this exercise is to improve the pony’s front leg technique, so he tucks his forelegs up quicker and more neatly. It stops that dropping feeling before a fence, so the pony is utilising his hindquarters, and his rider gets a better feel for a good jump.

The exercise itself is physically demanding, but it helped the pony get used to jumping with his hindquarters underneath him. It also ensured that his didn’t land to heavily on his shoulders, which meant he landed more lightly and so the overall quality of the canter improved as it became more uphill.

A slightly easier version of the staircase, which I used with a different client, has one canter stride between each jump, rather than being a bounce. It still got the horse thinking, cantering more uphill and picking up neatly over each fence.

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