Equine Nutritionist

There will be a few posts over the next week or so, which all link together to create the full story. So be patient.

I thought I’d share my experience with an equine nutritionist with you. It’s not something I’ve really thought about doing before, but it was surprisingly informative.

I’ve found Phoenix very tricky over the winter, in terms of her being very tense and reactive to ride – to the point that I can’t actually apply any aids. I was sorting the left hind muscular issue with physio, but she was still unhappy. When riding her, she was struggling to relax, but when I applied my right leg the whole of her right side was going rigid. It didn’t make sense. If her left hind was sore then she shouldn’t be resisting engaging the right hind. Her reaction was unlike any I’ve ever felt on a horse.

It was a puzzle, and when I stood back and looked at her, her stance was uptight, rigid; a horse in full flight mode. But nothing had changed. I did some thinking and asking around and then a theory came to me.

What is she’s suffering from stomach ulcers? Perhaps not full blown ulcers, but some form of gastric discomfort?

Phoenix wasn’t responding to the classic ulcer trigger points, and the only way to diagnose ulcers is to scope. Which involves sixteen hours of nil by mouth – a highly stressful situation for what is already a stressed horse. So I decided that I had nothing to lose by assuming she has them and coming up with a plan.

Then, with hindsight (isn’t that a great thing?) I realised that when she started living in at night she ate very little of her ad lib hay, and periodically had nights where she ate very little. She had been eating better recently though, upping her intake to what I would expect from a horse her size, except for the night before my epiphany.

Immediately I bought some haylage and started mixing it with her hay to encourage her to eat. A couple of days later, I thought her body language seemed happier. Which led me to wonder if I could improve her diet.

I didn’t want to go to a feed company and ask their advice; they have a product bias. I wanted someone independent to look at the whole picture. So after qualming slightly at the cost (but decided I could easily waste that amount on inappropriate supplements) I approached an independent equine nutritionist.

I had to fill out a lengthy form, answering questions about vet history, behaviour, current diet and management system. It was very in depth, but I did think it could be improved by requesting a photo because the condition scoring relied on my honesty, and me being knowledgeable enough to score her correctly.

A week later, I received a thorough report, which I thought I’d share the main points with you.

  • Phoenix’s behaviour suggested gastric discomfort, potentially ulcers, and is probably rooted in it being her first winter stabled overnight. The nutritionist suggested that it could take several seasons for an adult horse to acclimatise to stabling, which I didn’t realise. Whilst Phoenix didn’t show signs of stress outwardly, she probably internalised it, and her not eating hay overnight is a sign of stress. I should continue to mix in haylage to increase her forage intake. Again, with hindsight, I know that Phoenix will keep her worries to herself, so I have let her down here by not cottoning on quick enough, and her stresses have now bubbled over. The nutritionist suggested that I could offer Phoenix multiple different types of forage in the stable: different types of hay or haylage, a bucket of dampened chaff or grass nuts, which is definitely something to consider next year.
  • There was a paragraph, which I think is fairly compulsory, describing the importance of good dentistry and worming practice. As Phoenix is on a 6 monthly dental routine, and in her worm test last week had a clear result, I’m not concerned about these factors as a cause for her unhappiness, but of course everything needs to be considered.
    I am feeding Phoenix the correct amount of a suitable hard feed – 1kg of Pure Feed Fibre Balance – but the nutritionist found this to be lacking in zinc and copper, so I could either supplement these or change to a different feed.
    Again, there was another compulsory statement reminding me to ensure Phoenix has salt added to her diet when she’s working as feeds and forages don’t supply sufficient sodium.
    I was told to feed 20g of magnesium oxide – which is quadruple the recommended amount on my supplement tub – which is perhaps why I haven’t noticed a difference in her behaviour.
    I was also recommended to feed Phoenix a probiotic until she starts living out, and then again next winter. I’m currently using Protexin gut balancer, but a friend has told me that it isn’t that effective if a horse has an Alf-Alfa intolerance. So if I don’t find a difference in Phoenix, try a different brand.
  • The equine nutritionist also suggested that I could try a stomach supporting supplement or a calming supplement, but recommended that I made other changes first before exploring this avenue. She finished the nutritional report by saying that although I could end up feeding lots of different supplements they should all complement each other nicely.

What I liked about this nutrition report is that it wasn’t trying to sell me a product, it took into account her current lifestyle and limitations that I have with regard to yard rules or routines. The nutritionist had obviously taken on board my spiel about her behaviour, personality, physio, and adapted her recommendations to reflect this. I also felt I could go back with any queries, and feedback to her in a month’s time. She’s also given me a plan for next winter.

I’d definitely recommend speaking to an independent nutritionist if you need help designing your horse’s diet; they have the knowledge to save you hours of research, and only recommend brands that they think will benefit your horse. It’s not cheap, but for the cost of a private lesson or two (depends on your instructor!) it’s worth it in the long run.

Here’s hoping that the improvements I’ve seen in Phoenix since feeding her haylage, a probiotic, magnesium oxide, salt, zinc and copper, continue now that she is living out 24/7. Once she’s stopped gorging on all the grass of course!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s