Kids Going Cross Country

I taught a cross country clinic for Pony Club last weekend, aimed at the younger, less experienced members. They all enjoyed themselves, and after a large glass of wine that evening, I decided that I had too.

I’ll leave out the thrills and spills, but I wanted to discuss how I warmed them up as safely as possible.

In my first group most of them were nervous. I didn’t know many of the riders, and some of the ponies were new or had been cheeky in the past. My second group was more confident but, as I’ll tell you later, the ponies were more mischievous!

I started the group walking in a ride in a fairly large square to assess that the ponies. None were jogging or tossing their head in anticipation, so whilst the ride was walking up the hill I asked them to trot on. I hoped that any keen ponies would soon slow down with the extra effort of the hill. Thankfully they all trotted sensibly around, so I kept them all trotting until my riders visibly relaxed and the ponies definitely lost any cheeky spark.

Next, I needed to ensure the kids would be safe when we moved onto jumping a course. Ponies are herd animals by instinct and I didn’t want any to return to the ride at speed. One little rider in particular had been bolted with the last time she’d gone cross country so I needed to build her confidence up. Another rider had a new pony so we didn’t have a clue how he would behave, so I needed to quietly test him without giving him an excuse to fail the tests.

Keeping the ride in a group at the bottom of the hill, I sent them one at a time to trot up the hill, away from the ride, walk around a jump and walk back. This was to establish the fact that the ponies don’t return to their friends quickly, and that they left their friends at the speed requested by their rider. It also helped to build the riders’ confidence and self-belief in themselves. The pony who had bolted previously tried to jog on the way home, but his rider sat tall and positively half halted to stay in control. She became more aware of her pony quickening so reacted before he actually got faster.

Once they’d all done this exercise a few times and the ponies weren’t expecting to hurry home, we stepped it up. They cantered up the hill and then walked back to the others. Once I was sure of their control, they practised their cross country position, and by this time the ponies understood the rules of walking calmly home and were less fizzy. I don’t like to rush incorporating the light seat because it reduces a child’s control because they do not have their weight in the saddle to anchor them in when they apply a rein aid so a pony is more likely to put their head down and ignore their rider.

I did a very similar exercise with the next group, but one pony was nappy. He would gallop back to his friends, even halfway round a course! So I sent one rider on a calm pony away and asked her to wait at the far point. Then I sent off the nappy pony, and the two walked back together. The pony napped due to anxiety and I needed to manage the situation so my rider was safe and this kept everyone happy. The girl on the calm pony felt special because she had been given a particular job, so she was more than happy to oblige.

We started jumping in a similar way. The first jump, a simple, plain log, was jumped away from the ride, and then the children had to ride forwards to walk before returning calmly to the ride.

For the majority of the lessons I did courses which went away from the ride to encourage the riders to return steadily, and to ensure they could keep an energetic yet steady canter. Towards the end I started putting in jumps which went past the ride, and then a couple of jumps towards them. I still insisted that the riders pulled up and rejoined in walk.

It doesn’t always go to plan, but I find this technique for warming up horses and riders safest for taking the edge off excited horses, relaxing nervous riders, and establishing ground rules, which means their jumping becomes more enjoyable for both parties.

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