Centre Lines

After accidentally entering two dressage competitions with three centre lines in each test I dug around for some centre line exercises, for both Phoenix and my lovely clients.

To be able to ride a good centre line you and your horse need to be as straight and symmetrical as possible. But you also need to be comfortable on the centre line. So many horse and riders feel vulnerable on the centre line, with no fence to support them.

So initially, I began working on an inner track and using the centre line as a change of rein. Working away from the fence line encourages the rider to use their outside aids, and makes you more aware of any crookedness in your horse, or them drifting. I also like to ride lateral movements such as shoulder in or travers on the inner track as it emphasises any cheating on you or your horse’s behalf, as well as improving your feel for the movement and it’s correctness.

Once Phoenix was happy turning onto the centre line from both reins and staying straight throughout, I added in transitions.

A horse has to be as rideable as possible on the centre line, so it’s useful to get them used to riding various movements on the centre line. You also don’t want a horse to anticipate a halt transition at X every time they trot down the centre line. With both Phoenix and my clients I used a variety of transitions – halt, walk, rein back – to keep the horse’s attention on their rider and to get them riding straight transitions without the help of the fence. A pair of tramlines can be a useful intermediary measure to support the horse as they learn to stay straight.

One thing I noticed with many of my riders was that they could turn accurately onto the centre line, but then they were unaware of their slight drift down the centre line, which stemmed from the crookedness in their initial turn.

After some work on bringing the outside shoulder round on turns, I got them to ride the following exercise.

On the left rein in trot, turn onto the centre line and at X ride a 10m circle left. Continue down the centre line before turning right at the track. Right turn onto the centre line and this time ride a right 10m circle at X before continuing along the centre line and turning left.

A horse who turns onto the centre line in a slightly crooked way will not carry themselves straight so are liable to drift through the outside shoulder. This may be a minimal drift, but the lack of straightness will compromise the quality of their gait and their turn at the end.

The 10m circles towards the wall will improve the rider’s accuracy as they won’t want to crash into the fence, so will engage their outside aids and ride the outside shoulder around the circle more. As they return to the centre line, it will become apparent if they’ve forgotten the outside aids as their horse will overshoot the centre line, and wobble along it. If they forget to ride straight out of the circle they will struggle to turn at the end because the horse is bending the wrong way.

To ride this exercise well, the rider needs to ride accurately with their outside aids onto the centre line, and focus on channelling the horse along the centre line, before minimising the bend through their neck on the circle, and using the outside aids to turn. Focusing on straightening the horse as they ride out of the circle improves the second half of the centre line and then, because the horse is not in counter bend, they will turn onto their new rein in a more balanced way.

I like this exercise for assessing straightness, before doing some other exercises to ensure the horse is working on two tracks and then using lateral work to establish the outside rein and engage the inside hind leg, before finishing the session with the original centre line exercise so that the rider gets a feeling for a horse is travelling straight in a good balance. Increasing familiarity with the centre line will improve test marks, and improving the finishing strides of a circle will improve accuracy marks and the marks of the next movement.

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