Creating Positivity

I was looking back at my notes from the Pony Club Coaching Conference back in February and was reminded of the subject of creating positivity in lessons.

You create a positive atmosphere within the teaching environment from your body language, tone of voice, having a progressive lesson plan, and most importantly with the language you use.

The words and phrases you use when talking to a client is what builds a confident, strong mentality of self-belief, which leads to success. It also makes them resilient when things don’t go as planned, and give them a firmer mindset and set of beliefs.

So what words and phrases are more positive to use when teaching?

It’s not saying things like “don’t do this” or “that’s wrong”. It’s giving an instruction to alter something which will improve their performance by focusing on the good bits.

For example, let’s say that the left rein is too long with a flimsy contact. Don’t berate the fact that this is wrong as it creates a negative cycle of thoughts. Equally, the rider needs to know that the left rein needs to be improved so don’t ignore it altogether. Say things like, “you have a good right rein contact, but you tend to have a longer left rein…” And “before starting, check your left hand is as good as your right”. Or even, “shorten your left rein” as this is an action and results in a positive response from the rider. They shorten that rein without thinking about how bad it is. Yet if you were to ask them later which hand was their weaker one, they would subconsciously know.

Another situation would be if an exercise is ridden too fast, you would tell your rider that it was too fast – don’t beat around the bush – but before they try it again, you don’t send them off with the phrase “not as fast as last time”, because that plants a seed of negativity and prevents them from riding in a forwards manner, which could create other problems. Instead, phrases like “find a steadier tempo before you start”, or “this time I’d like you to give yourself as much time as you can” will send them off with a plan. Ride the exercise in a more steady fashion; they will still ride positively and actively, but they are focused more on their new, steadier tempo. And because they have a positive mental attitude, they are more likely to succeed.

You’re reminding your rider of their fault, but without detracting from their focus to an exercise.

I like to think that I used positive phrases to my teaching before the conference, but certainly since then I’ve been cross checking myself to make sure I spend as little time telling riders “don’t do this” as possible, and instead say “do that” to counteract their “this”.

Instead of saying “don’t let your lower leg swing backward as you trot”, saying “keep your feet going down to the floor as you trot” or “relax your knee and drop your heel to keep your lower leg still”. There’s a solution within my corrections. I know I’m not perfect, and I keep having to change my tact mid sentence, but I hope my clients are noticing and feeling that they come away from lessons with a can-do attitude, fully knowledgeable about how to improve their and their horse’s performance.

Have you ever noticed, and felt that a teacher (of whatever subject) had an overly negative effect on your confidence with just a few poorly chosen words? Or have you noticed a change in your approach to riding as a result of your support network using, well, supportive language?

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