Getting Back into Jumping

I had my first jump with Phoenix for three months last weekend. I didn’t jump her initially during lockdown and then the ground has been so hard I haven’t wanted to use the jumping paddock. I was going to hire a training venue, but then saw a local gridwork clinic so decided that was a better option. Phoenix benefits from lots of grids to stop her rushing and engaging her brain, but it always involves so much getting on and off to adjust poles! Yes, I am lazy!

Anyway, the layout was excellent and I shall be using it for my own clients, so watch out!

There was a grid of three jumps placed on the centre line, one stride between each one and the middle jump on X. Then across the diagonals, between M and X, and H and X, were three canter poles, before one stride and the pole at X.

The session was all about straightness so we warmed up cantering straight across the diagonals, obviously traversing the pole at X on an angle. We worked on riding the corner in a balanced way so that we were straight over the poles and didn’t drift. Then the second and third canter poles were converted into bounces, as alternate diagonal poles. This meant that if you drifted towards the lower side over the first pole you had to jump the higher side of the next pole.

Once the raised canter poles were established and the horses confident over them and staying fairly straight the jump at X was raised to an upright and we jumped diagonally across the arena a few times.

Phoenix tends to load her right shoulder when jumping. She used to do it on the flat but as she’s getting stronger she’s carrying it more, but when caught up in the excitement of jumping she will regress to loading it. Which means that this exercise, particularly off the left rein, is highly beneficial.

The exercise is actually very straightforward if you can ride a straight line. The bounces help lift the shoulders, engage the hocks, and subsequently the upright is cleared easily and neatly. Sometimes when jumping on an angle a horse is inclined to drift through the open side. Partly because of the visual effect of the jump drawing them outwards, partly because the horse is crooked, and partly because the rider isn’t channelling their horse straight with the leg and hand. If you have the foundation right in your flatwork then the jumps will follow.

The next exercise was building the centre line grid up to two uprights and an oxer. The work across the diagonals developing straightness was put to the test with uprights and very little to guide the eye. The improved bascule and confidence in the horse’s jump also shows the benefits of improving their straightness.

We rode courses, linking all three lines up, and then finally changed the angled bounces to an upright, making a one stride double with the jump at X.

Having a lot of poles definitely helped Phoenix slow down and think about the job in hand, and the straightness work improved her bascule and ability to make related distances easy in a regular rhythm. Watch out clients, you’ll see some similar exercises soon!

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