Online Learning

The idea of distance learning has been around for years. Whilst taking my A-levels I did an Open University short course as part of a project to help students choose a degree. It was fairly enjoyable, but I think I only managed it because I was already devoting my life to studying and didn’t have any other plates to spin. How adults return to learning with a job and family is beyond me.

Over the last year though, distance learning has made a huge leap forwards. Instead of it being for mature students, or the infirm; every school child has done it at some point or another. They will have done different amounts of online learning, but kids of all ages have had to learn to learn with less support from their teachers.

I would never have considered having to teach equitation online last year. The closest I’d ever gotten to distance teaching was giving a client guidance when they sent me their concerns between lessons. It may have been as simple as guiding them on adjusting their horse’s diet, or how to overcome a simple nap in the arena. But they were all short term plasters; damage limitation until I saw them in five days time.

The first lockdown in the spring saw me offering to teach the BHS Challenge Awards over Zoom. As well as giving feedback on riding videos or teaching a child wearing a backpack containing a Bluetooth speaker connected to their parent filming them in the middle of the arena – I tell you what, you get a lot less back chat when communication is one way! That was a challenge, and not ideal, but useful to keep them ticking over and refocus them on the basics.

Now of course, we’re still allowed to teach private lessons, but unfortunately Pony Club has had to halt all face to face activities. In the spring we did some photo comps, weekly riding exercises, achievement badge activities. But this time we’d already planned the efficiency test training up until the Easter holidays.

So I had my work cut out coming up with Plan B, but the result is that my branch is offering training from D test to B test. For my part, I’m training the younger members for their D and D+ tests, as well as offering achievement badges for the youngest members, and those not ready for their next efficiency test.

I’ll be honest, it’s unchartered territory for me. And the kids know how to use Zoom better than me – “you have to share sound separately, Susy” – but I’m enjoying the challenge of working out how to teach from a screen.

To begin with, I made a PowerPoint for the two efficiency tests. I made one PowerPoint as the D+ test has a very similar syllabus to the D test, just more in depth, so one PowerPoint, with special D+ slides covers everything.

Everyone learns in different ways, so I felt it was important to try and bring in several different learning styles. I found some videos to supplement where I would demonstrate if we were in person; such as putting a headcollar on; then put a combination of notes and pictures on the slides, which together with me talking and posing questions, ticked most learning styles. Screen sharing has proved to be a very useful tool!

I also find that kids, especially younger ones, can find it difficult to verbalise a process, or describe something using words. So for our points of the horse session, I told all of them to bring a toy pony along (or photo for the older ones) and as we went through the different points, they could point to the appropriate place on their pony. I also used my, I mean Mallory’s, rocking horse to stick labels onto. When I did the pony behaviour badge with the younger children they had to show me using their model pony and rider how to approach a pony, where to stand to lead it, how to turn them out, etc.

I’ve also added activities into the training, which they can do with me, or afterwards, as revision. For the youngest kids, we had a matching exercise (draw a line from the horses face to the matching emoji, to the word) and some colouring. This meant that the pre schoolers could do the colouring while I talked to the older members at a slightly higher level.

I think for the topic of tack for the D and D+ training I will recruit the rocking horse, as the tack is removable. And for the colours and markings badge I want to do in a couple of weeks time, I’ve got a painting exercise for us to all do together. But I’ll continue to think outside the box for ways to engage the children, who usually have the attention span of a gnat on a hotplate!

Please send any other ideas on a postcard!

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