2020. The Year of Change.

2020 is coming to a close and whilst 2021 isn’t starting much better, I think it comes with hope.

It’s not been the year that anyone predicted (I won’t go into the details; you’ll find them in the history books in 50 years time) but there have been highs and lows, and lots of self discovery. And it’s worth reflecting upon.

I know the pandemic has hit many people hard, and in all honesty, I’ve been very sheltered from it all. I think it’s a reflection of the company I keep in that I’ve only known a handful of people who have had mild look-after-yourself-at-home cases of Covid. We’ve been careful, but we have a toddler so therefore don’t have a busy social calendar. There’s a few things we’re missing out on; the good friends (you know, the ones you actually miss laughing about nothing with) and family. But can you imagine if this had happened 20 years ago when the Internet was in toddlerhood? We can Zoom to our hearts content.

I’ve now been a whole year in my role as Chief Instructor for a large and thriving Pony Club branch. It wasn’t the year we had planned, but I was certainly kept busy drawing up lockdown activities, jumping through hoops to get rallies up and running with the necessary protocols in place. I now feel like I know the majority of members and have a clearer understanding of them, their ponies and their aspirations. Don’t tell them, but I love this role!

Then my day business, Starks Equitation, had a compulsory hiatus in the spring. Which, whilst I would never have ever considered a six week holiday, was quite enjoyable. It actually gave me chance to do some life and home admin, refresh my professional side, attend some webinars, and enjoy the special time when a 2 year old transitions from limited phrases that only a parent can understand, to elaborate two way conversations (read arguments). This period did make me appreciate my job even more, so I was more than happy to hand over childcare duties and return to work. Since then, my work hasn’t really been affected by the pandemic. We’re outside; the lessons are individual; we can’t get too close to each other; we’re around horses so therefore hands get washed before touching our faces!

If anything, Starks Equitation has benefitted from the lack of competitions and organised rides, and limited social diaries, as horse owners are focusing their energies on their training at home, getting the fresh air and exercise so needed when working from home, as well as the psychological boost that our equine friends supply.

So professionally, life hasn’t really changed much. Personally, it has and it hasn’t.

I think the main thing that 2020 has taught me is how lucky I am. We have a stable family life; few arguments and a big enough house that we can get the desired space we need. We have a garden to make the most of the good weather. We have horses, which is an excellent excuse to get some fresh air each day, as well as giving me some me time. We are financially secure enough that we can purchase equipment for an activity to do at home, or buy a new coat so that we can continue with daily walks in winter.

I’ve never had a huge desire to travel, and yes we missed out on our trip to Austria for my 30th birthday. But it will still be there when we’re allowed to go. And in the grand scheme of things it’s really a first world problem, isn’t it? Whilst it would be nice to have a couple of days away from our house, it’s not a bad house, and not a life or death issue. I’ve learnt that I am really quite contented at home in my own bubble. I knew I was always a home girl at heart, but a lack of social obligations has made me realise I’m more than I realised.

It’s been a life saver having horses to tend each day; a reason to keep going; and also the fact that you will distantly bump into others at the yard, which takes away any loneliness and the change in conversation is refreshing.

I have discovered these last couple of weeks, perhaps it’s my body and brain reaching the end of the year and being reset, that I’m feeling aimless in my riding with Phoenix. She’s working well, but with limited competitions, and the risk of them being cancelled, I’m losing motivation to school her. Instead, I’ve been hacking more, but I do need a change of scenery – to hire a venue to school over a course of showjumps, or to hack on different territory. Yes we can technically still do this, but is it morally correct? And half the fun of these things is going with a friend. Which you can’t. So I’m lacking the enthusiasm to do this. I’ll sort myself out by 2021! I’m enjoying my time with her, which is the main thing.

From a family perspective, I feel like 2020 has drawn us together. There’s more juggling with limited childcare, but we’re more involved with her development, and can see our influences on her behaviour daily. We’re lucky to have a single household slash childcare bubble, which definitely helps relieve the pressure, and again gives variety to conversation. I’ve also found that doing so much online I’m saving quite a bit of driving time, and that is usefully utilised with self-care routines, like brushing my hair properly, exercise classes, booking chiropractor appointments instead of meaning to for weeks. As a result, I feel like my confidence in my self has improved.

2020. It’s had it’s ups, although it may be hard to find them sometimes, and has taught us much about ourselves. So before kicking 2020 out the back door on New Years Eve, remind yourself of the positive memories it’s given you.

If it’s taught us one thing, it should be this:

Leisure (1911)
W.H. Davies
What is this life if, full of care,
We have no time to stand and stare?-

No time to stand beneath the boughs
And stare as long as sheep or cows:

No time to see, when woods we pass,
Where squirrels hide their nuts in grass:

No time to see, in broad daylight,
Streams full of stars, like skies at night:

No time to turn at Beauty’s glance,
And watch her feet, how they can dance:

No time to wait till her mouth can
Enrich that smile her eyes began?

A poor life this if, full of care,
We have no time to stand and stare.

Here We Go Again!

At the beginning of last week the UK had the corona virus tier system was adjusted, coming into effect at the weekend. This led to a long conversation about the Pony Club Christmas rally. Which was popular, and highly anticipated by many.

We decided to go ahead and I busied myself with finalising times, making the invariable last minute swaps, planning the games I’d do, trying to make them as prop-less as possible. Friday I went and bought a load of chocolates, apples, baby potatoes (for the egg and spoon race). Saturday we went for a walk and cut down some branches for the Decorate the Tree game. I was ready for the fun!

Then Saturday evening came the announcement that we would be moving up into a new Tier 4, and so Pony Club activities needed to be suspended. Oh, and Christmas is cancelled.

They’re first world problems, but the punched-in-the-gut feeling was demoralising and disheartening. We moped around on Saturday night. Earlier in the week when we’d discussed cancelling the rally I’d felt fine; secretly I’d have been relieved at the prospect of more time for last minute Christmas preparations, but I then remembered how disappointed the kids would be. I then threw myself into preparations. To then have all my preparations finished and it then be cancelled was disappointing to say the least.

We spent Sunday as a family, doing a few more last minute Christmas jobs, but then by the evening with the confirmation that I could continue to teach, I had to rejig my diary around the lack of childcare. However, with nowhere to go, there’s no hurry to finish work on Wednesday lunchtime! That’s all sorted now, we’ve perked up at the thought of Christmas at home – helped by the fact we managed to buy all the necessary foodstuff yesterday – but we’ll have to scratch our heads and think how to fill our week off with a toddler and less than attractive forecast. Perhaps we can get some DIY jobs done?

The first lockdown I took on some big projects around the house – clearing out and sorting out. But I’m so over rearranging the kitchen cupboards now!

Then I remembered I hadn’t shared with you my other lockdown project. Which was actually started at the end of the first lockdown, ticked over in the summer, and then picked up again for the second lockdown.

In 2019 a friend gave me a large wooden rocking horse on gliders. Thr stuff of childhood dreams. With a tufty mane, flaked paint, and battered saddle. It sat in my garage and then I decided to take on the challenge in June. Over the summer, with varying degrees of enthusiasm, I sanded off five layers of paint.

After debating on the colour of the horse, I ordered some non toxic, tough paint. Of course I ordered too much. I also ordered a new mane and tail for the horse. More on that later. And measured the horse up for new tack.

On my initial search for rocking horse restoration I found a company and immediately bought the mane and tail pieces. Unfortunately, I’m disappointed with the product as it is real hair attached to real hide (an experience in itself) but came in several short lengths of hide, with hair of varying length (I assume from a pulled tail). My horse, being a large size, needed the full length of hide, but unfortunately this means that the mane doesn’t lie smoothly along the horse’s neck, and is shorter than I’d have liked. I’m really pleased with how the tail has come out. Once the hide had dried and hardened, I combed the hair and trimmed it.

Later on, when looking for the tack, I came across another company, The Rocking Horse Shop, and I wish I’d found them sooner. I had clear instructions on how to measure the horse for a saddle and bridle, both of which are fully adjustable and removable. It was all made to measure, and I even had a phone call from their workshop to confirm my measurements and the tack fits perfectly. Their website was also very helpful about all sorts of restoration questions I had.

I’m fairly pleased with the result of this project. I tried to do a dappling effect over the face and neck, to make an iron grey horse. But this was beyond my artistic talents. I’m still not happy with the mane, although it looks better than when I first attached it, I’d still prefer one length of hide. I might look at doing something about that next year. Some one is happy with her rocking horse though so it’s a win in that department. Not sure it’s delaying an actual pony by very long though!

Looking After Ourselves

We all put so much effort into the wellbeing of our beloved equines, that it’s ironic how little attention we pay to our own bodies and lifestyles.

Recently I’ve been giving myself a kick up the butt and taking time for self-care.

I have a Friday evening routine of chocolate, wine and a hot bath. Except last night apparently when the hot water has all been used up… Which is downtime for me, where I process the week, think of and plan the weekend, and as much as I can, relax. That along with my early morning rides are my emotional self care and everyone knows not to disturb me during this time!

I used to regularly visit a sports masseuse and osteopath, but post pregnancy it’s gone out the window and then I tried a new osteopath and came away poorer, but not feeling the benefit. However, with shooting pain running up my femoral nerve when I rode anything wider than a hat rack, I took the plunge and tried a Mctimoney chiropractor. Who incidentally treats Phoenix. She declared me very broken, with a tilted pelvis and tight muscles; but a couple of (painful) sessions later and I can feel the benefits. Definitely won’t leave it as long to get myself straightened up and I instantly felt the benefits to my riding. I’d been struggling with Phoenix’s right half pass, which retrospectively isn’t surprising given that my seat was blocking her. It’s still her weaker side but at least now I’m helping her.

At the beginning of the year, a friend told me that their metabolism had slowed down as soon as she’d hit 30 and she’s fought her weight ever since. Bearing in mind that I hit the big three-oh this year, her comment stuck with me. I also feel fairly big on Phoenix; I’m not too big, but I’m very aware that I don’t need to weigh her down with extra baggage. During the first UK lockdown and into the summer I tried to do more exercise, but lacked the motivation to watch a Joe Wicks YouTube video. No one held me accountable if I didn’t do it, and I hadn’t lost out by not doing it. Equally, I didn’t particularly push myself on the few that I did do because no one was cracking the whip.

So I decided that really I should join a fitness class and get myself a personal trainer of some sort. However, I already have an active job and go to Pilates weekly so I needed to compliment this. Plus there’s the whole time, childcare juggling act to factor in.

I’ve also been teaching a lot of children recently, involving a lot of lead rein work, which made me aware that I’m not fit from a cardiovascular point of view and running in canter was far more tiring than it should be!

I eventually plucked up the courage to ask a trainer, recommended by a client, and who I vaguely knew, if I could join a weekly class of hers. This coincided with lockdown #2 so became an online class, as did my Pilates.

I’m not sure how well online exercise classes will fare long term. For me, I gain a bit of extra time in the day – that spent travelling to the class – and I don’t have to worry about childcare. Just some strategic planning with snacks and activities. However, if you aren’t used to doing exercise, or have previous injuries I can imagine you could do yourself some damage as your trainer can’t monitor you as closely on screen as in person. You also miss out on the social side, and if you’re an office worker, the outdoors time. Neither of which affects me, as I can moan about the number of burpees we had to do with my client who signed me up and actually enjoy the opportunity to be warm and dry for an hour! There’s probably a balance to be struck between online classes and face to face ones; but it will be interesting to see what happens when restrictions lift and social distancing reduced.

The first week was agony. It took me three days to be able to walk upstairs. But each week is feeling easier and I can definitely feel muscles developing. I’m sure this cardio and strength work will help my overall fitness, and I think one class of this and another of pilates combined with more than ten hours in the saddle a week is enough focused exercise.

It’s amazing the difference a little bit of self care makes in terms of energy levels, quality of sleep, quality of work and enthusiasm. I’m also having two early morning rides at the yard each week which takes the pressure off me needing to ride when a certain toddler isn’t feeling cooperative, and means Phoenix gets two decent workouts which means she’s less of an activated grenade to ride for the rest of the week should work and weather limit my opportunities to ride. Plus, I enjoy those mornings of peace.

I tend to make small changes to create new habits rather than going all in and causing problems, so after Christmas my self care resolutions will be to adjust my diet to help maximise my energy levels and then having my hair cut (sorely neglected because I don’t like going to salons and the whole pandemic situation). Maybe I’ll cut it all off and donate it to charity to make a wig…

Anyway, make a couple of changes for yourself, and put as much effort into making yourself feel and perform at your best that we do with our horses!

Safety Stirrups

I’ve come to realise that I have a couple of hang ups when teaching. One is chin straps being tight enough to stop the children talking. I joke. But they mustn’t be able to get the strap in front of their chin as their hat becomes loose. Or spend their time chewing the end of the strap.

My other hang up is stirrups. I hate seeing kids riding in non safety stirrups. I prefer to see adults using them too, particularly when jumping, but I understand that they can make their own informed decision. Kids though, have far less control at keeping their stirrup iron on the ball of their foot, with the iron often getting close to the ankle. So I’d much rather have the option of the foot coming out sideways in an emergency, particularly when jumping.

The traditional peacock stirrups are my usual go to for kids as they are affordable and as soon as pressure is applied to the outside of the stirrup iron the rubber pops off, freeing the foot. Of course there’s always the odd band with a life of it’s own which is forever springing off.

For adults, there’s the bent leg stirrup irons, which I have on my jump saddle. Stronger because they’ve iron on both sides of the foot, the shape means the foot is able to come out easily. I bent a pair once, whilst hacking Matt out. He spooked, slipped on some mud at the side of the lane and fell onto his side. My leg was between him and the tarmac. I survived with just a bruised foot, but the stirrup iron was bent. When a similar incident happened a month later when I was schooling without stirrups my foot had much more of a squash injury.

Anyway, I digress. Bent leg irons are still popular, and I definitely prefer to see my riders in them as opposed to fillis irons.

You may remember a month or so ago Harry Meade had a fall cross country, which resulted in his foot getting caught and he was dragged along. Regardless of his stirrup irons (I have no idea what stirrups he uses so not passing any judgment) if a rider as good as Harry can get their foot stuck in a stirrup it should serve as a warning to all of us. Use safety stirrups!

The two safety stirrups I’m familiar with have been around for donkeys years. Incidentally, did you know that donkey originally rhymed with monkey when it first came into general usage in the 18th century because it derived from the word dun, describing the colour? I.e. It was dunkey, not donkey.

More digression, apologies. Since hearing about Harry Meade’s accident I’ve done some research into safety stirrups on the market now because technology has moved on in recent years and there’s bound to be more modern alternatives which I’d like to be more informed about.

Modern safety stirrups, such as the Acavello or Equipe, have a release mechanism on the outer strut. When pressure is applied to the outside the strut pops out and the foot is released. The strut can then be clicked back into place. Some makes have magnetic clips, others have springs, others have a silicon outer strut. From what I can tell, it’s important to keep the stirrup irons clean and free of grit as this might cause the mechanism to become stuck. And to monitor the condition of any springs or magnets so they don’t weaken and damage the integrity of the product.

I’ve a couple of clients starting to use Acavello safety stirrups, attracted also by their grippy tread, and they certainly seem to have been extensively tested for safety. Definitely some for me to consider when I need new jump stirrups, or am asked for my opinion.

I think in light of Harry Meade’s accident, it’s worth checking our own stirrups. Do they need new treads, peacock rubbers etc? Are they the best design for our foot? Are they the right size for us? Are they safety stirrups?

Pipe Dreaming

Every so often, do you allow yourself to dream? I’m always hearing competitions on the radio – when you hear a song, ring in and win money. I never ring in. I don’t have a good track record of winning lucky dip competitions. I was always the grandchild returning from Weymouth carnival empty handed, before being given the teddy that Granny had won as compensation. The only competitions I’ve ever won are from hard work.

It doesn’t stop me from pipe dreaming though. What would I do with a sizeable lump sum of money?

I wouldn’t go crazy, stop working, travel the world, buy a brand new range rover or anything. But I’d definitely move house I think.

Recently I’ve come to the conclusion that what I want from our next house is enough space for Otis at the bottom of the garden. Just 3 acres or so. Enough for him and some sheep for company. Or possibly the pony. A slightly bigger house would be great – four bedrooms and an extra downstairs room to lighten the working from home burden. Detached. On the edge of a large village. I’d be very happy with that setup. Not too much housework, and a moderate garden. But space for Otis to join in family BBQs. Don’t worry, I’ve not forgotten Phoenix. She can come for any holidays. But she needs the facilities of a livery yard, and I like the social side.

But what if money were no object? What could I live with? It sounds such a hardship. But you know what I mean. What would be my utopia?

I love teaching, so there’s no way I’d stop. I rediscovered that today after a couple of weeks of feeling decidedly average in the coaching department. But I wouldn’t want the hassle of a livery yard. Or the invasion of privacy.

I’ve mulled it over and I think I would want a fairly small house – five bedrooms maximum. Not like these ten bedroom mansions I keep spotting online. A sensibly sized garden. Half a dozen stables. An arena – bigger than a 20x40m so it has more scope for jumping. And something like 8 acres. I could live with slightly less.

So what would I do with this? It’s too small to be a livery yard and I’ve not changed my mind on it being too much hassle. Instead, I’d have 3 permanent residents – Otis, Phoenix and a pony. Then I’d offer holiday, training and rehab livery for one or two horses. If anyone was on holiday, or out of action due to illness or injury, then their horse could come on a working holiday with me. If someone needs help training their horse, then I could offer a bootcamp, and if an owner is struggling with a rehabilitation programme – walking out twice daily or restricted turnout – then I could offer this on a quieter setting, which many horses would benefit from alongside the consistency I could provide. All alongside my freelance teaching.

I could run monthly clinics myself , or hire out the arena for Riding Club clinics and Pony Club rallies. Or I could just offer my arena for clients to come and have lessons with me. Offering clinics would then cover my need for social support with Phoenix. Equally, perhaps I have one livery who is a chosen friend who could provide some chore cover and be a friend to hack out with. Alternatively, a nice equestrian neighbour who I could hack out with would be lovely.

I think this would strike the balance for me between having privacy at home, and earning a sufficient income to cover the running costs of a small stable yard.

It slightly scares me how much livery fees are when I start thinking of the inevitable pony which will arrive in the next couple of years. Especially when you consider that during the winter small people often lose interest. If the pony could spend the winter at home with Otis (such as in scenario one) there would be less workload in terms of stable chores, less pressure to work the pony in dark evenings, and less financial pressure. In both scenarios, the pony could be ridden during school holidays and on fine weekend days either on little hacks or in the school. Surely when you factor in livery fees, this option is becoming increasingly economically viable.

Of course, it is a tie having horses at home, but with the world changing we’re spending more time at home and it wouldn’t be too expensive to have a house sitter for when we went away – solving both the cat and horse problem.

So if anyone knows a suitable property and can provide a lump sum, please get in touch! In the meantime, I’ll carry on daydreaming.

The Art of Rugging – a lost skill?

I’ve neglected my blog a bit but in my current state of permanently exhausted pigeon as parent to a toddler in the midst of the terrible twos I’ve only been getting as far as thinking that something would make a good subject for a blog. I’m like a writer with lots of titles at the top of empty pages in their book.

My musings over the weekend, after clipping Phoenix and overhearing numerous conversations about what rug to put on – a hot topic every autumn. I believe that the art of rugging a horse so that they are a happy individual is being lost in the details over rug thicknesses and the theoretical side. Rather like how old horsemen had the intuition and connection to horses, which has become lost in modern day horse ownership.

Years ago, about fifteen I’d say, you’d buy a lightweight rug, which is from zero fill to about 150g filling; a medium weight rug which goes up to about 300 g filling; or a heavyweight rug which has in excess of 300g filling. You didn’t know the exact weight of the rug, but could get a good idea based on it’s feel. You’d then put said rug on depending on the weather, if your horse was clipped, if they were stabled and so on. It was simple and ultimately you stuck your hand inside, just by the shoulder, and could feel if the horse was too hot, too cold, or just right. Then you made adjustments accordingly.

Nowadays (I feel so old saying that!) every rug has the filling weight listed on the label. Which is useful in deciding if this lightweight is heavier than that lightweight. But the whole rugging system has become so mathematical.

All I hear people say now is “I’m putting on a Xg rug tonight… You’re only putting on a (X-50)g rug?… But so and so is putting on a (X+50)g rug.” yes, I do realise my use of X harks back to my A-level maths days. But you get the idea. Everyone now compares their rugging decision to their stable neighbour; and looks at the precise weight of the rug, perhaps tweaking layers on an hourly basis, but less attention is taken to the weather and environment – is it wet cold or dry cold? Is the wind easterly? Will the shelter in the field protect them from the wind coming from that direction? And does the horse actually feel warm or cold?

I worry that everyone is getting bogged down in the numbers of rugging, and not listening to their horse, or judging the actual weather conditions. And of course, knowing the precise weight of rug which is on each horse means direct comparisons are forever being made. Without consideration for the horse’s individual tolerance for the environment.

For example, Phoenix needs more rugs than she should theoretically given her condition score and breeding. But she shivers on the damp, cool nights, is tight over her back the following morning, and generally not as pleasant to ride. I’m taking the layering approach this year so I can remove the top rug in the morning and replace it at night with ease; last week I was using a couple of lightweights (50g each to be precise) as she hadn’t been clipped. She needs slightly more protection on wet days due to her personal preference and lack of shelter in her field. But that’s just her. I was irked to discover that someone had been interfering; horrified that she had two rugs on, on an evening when heavy rain forecast. Believe it or not, she was comfortably warm when that someone checked under her rugs. And the next morning she was a dry, warm, very happy horse. Besides, those two 50g rugs only equal a 100g rug, which is still classified as a lightweight rug, if you want to be pedantic. It’s just easier to remove one rug rather than remove a thicker rug and replace it with a thinner one. And I’m all about an easy life!

I think the moral of the story, is to stop getting waylaid by the numbers on rugs and what your stable neighbours are doing, but focus on responding to your horse’s feedback and reading the weather forecast. Every horse is an individual and tolerates different temperatures differently – some don’t like being too hot in rugs and actually run a bit hot. Others don’t mind being slightly warmer in a rug and struggle with the cold, particularly when it’s also wet and windy. It’s down to us as owners to read the signs from our individual horse, rather than focusing on the numbers or making comparisons. You know you’ve got it right when your horse is dry, not changing weight in a negative way (they’ll drop weight if they’re cold, and put it on if they’re hot); aren’t tucked in, shivering or holding themselves protectively; and not grumpy!

Is The Canter 3 beats or 4?

It’s a tricky one. Because it’s both three beat or four beat depending on your level of training; and tricky in that it is also both correct and incorrect with four beats.

Confused? Yep, a lot of people are from my observations.

Let’s start with average Jo Bloggs, working up to elementary level with an average all rounder horse. You know the type. Which I think encompasses the majority of leisure riders. A correct canter for you is a three beat canter; the outside hind coming forwards followed by the inside hind and outside fore together, then the inside fore and the moment of suspension.

You might have heard coaches talking about the fact your canter is four beat, or talking about improving the quality of the canter so it is more of a three beat canter. A lot of leisure horses can have a four beat canter, when the diagonal pair becomes broken and those feet don’t touch the ground simultaneously. But in a negative way. The sequence of legs is the outside hind, outside fore, inside hind, inside fore. It’s almost a lateral canter, and results from a number of issues. A horse who is too much on the forehand, lacking impulsion or activity in the hindquarters, has an interfering rider, has poor conformation or stiffness in their hindlimbs, is likely to develop this lateral, four beat rhythm. Sometimes when a horse loses balance they will revert to the four beat, lateral canter, when otherwise they have a three beat canter.

So this laterally four beat canter is not good from a training perspective because it’s very difficult to create the elevation needed for collection and lateral work. You can improve it by the use of polework, using more seat and leg to create impulsion, using hillwork and medium canter to create a more active hindleg, but ultimately it is performance limiting, so you’d struggle with advanced level work. This type of four beat canter is called negative diagonal advance placement (DAP).

That’s the negative four beat canter out the way, now let’s look at the positive four beat canter. Have you ever seen photos of elite horses, youngsters or under saddle, and noticed how uphill their canter is? And how there is no way the diagonal pair hit the ground simultaneously because the forelegs are so elevated? Well you’d be right. The inside hind does land fractionally before the outside fore. This is called positive diagonal advance placement.

So why is a sequence of footfall outside hind, inside hind, outside fore, inside fore, seen as a positive four beat canter? Well firstly, a horse who can engage their hindquarters that much will be more powerful and find collection easy. If you watch a horse doing a canter pirouette you will see that it is a definite 4 beat canter, which it has to be in order for them to be able to rotate almost on the spot. A horse who is unable to canter with a positive DAP will find this level of work nigh on impossible.

This means that when you are looking for the next future dressage champion, you are looking for a four beat canter, a positive DAP, as that suggests that they will be able to perform at the higher levels. A good example is below.

I had a look through my photos and found one of Phoenix at her first prelim. She had an unbalanced canter at the time, and you can see that although it looks lovely at first sight, she is showing slight negative DAP. I’m struggling to find proof of her recent canter work (apparently babysitting duties trumps cameraman duties?!) but just by her becoming stronger and more balanced she shows strides of positive DAP, particularly when she relaxes into collected canter work.

I then also found this image of Matt, showing slight positive DAP. Of course, not on par with the elite dressage stars, but a useful example.

This image of Matt brings me onto my final point, or musing. At what point does a positive DAP become a gallop? After all, the sequence of footfalls is the same on paper – outside hind, inside hind, outside fore, inside fore. I asked my trainer for her opinion, and she thought the gallop was differentiated because of it’s speed and the horse’s carriage whilst galloping – long and flat rather than uphill. She also helped explain that in a three beat canter the footfalls are regular, in a four beat canter the diagonal pair aren’t landing together, but they aren’t a whole beat apart. It’s like they’re slightly off beat. In musical terms: crotchet, quaver, quaver, crotchet.

There is loads of information about diagonal advanced placement, and it happens in the trot too, so go and have a look on Google. And when you come out the other end of the rabbit hole, let me know what you think of the subject!