The Way The Mane Lies

I read a really interesting article about what the lay of the mane tells you about a horse’s body.

In a nutshell, a foal is curled inside the womb either to the left or to the right. The side they curl to is their naturally more bendy side before undergoing training (as don’t forget that a lot of training focuses on straightness) and this is also the way their mane falls. The mane, so long as it’s not trained to lay on the offside because it’s more traditional, falls to the side the horse bends more easily to, even over bending in some instances. It’s to do with muscle fascia, but I’m afraid that’s getting far too complicated for my little brain to comprehend so for that information I’d recommend asking a physio or Google.

I had never heard of this before, having just presumed horses who’s manes fell left were the left handers of the equine world. Phoenix’s mane falls left and I hadn’t even made the connection between her softer left rein and more resistant right rein.

After reading this article, which you can find here I started to pay attention to all the horses I see and their manes. Of course my observations are limited by the fact that we still subconsciously lay the mane right, and neck rugs compound this laying, so like a lot of lefties, left lay manes can often pass as right lay manes. This limits my observations a bit, but when grooming Phoenix s couple of weeks ago I had a light bulb moment.

She doesn’t wear a rug at the moment and her mane has gone from a very definite left lay, to sitting either left or right with minimal effort and if anything going upright or favouring lying to the right. It’s almost as though her mane has been blow dried to increase the volume by encouraging the roots to stand up. Ladies, you’ll understand what I mean. Before it was very flat to her crest. Thinking about her current way of going, she is much straighter and stronger so presumably the improvement in her muscle tone and strength is causing her mane to change it’s lay. It will be interesting to see whether it stays right, upright, or reverts left as she continues to develop.

I asked a friend who’s a physiotherapist for her opinion on mane lay. Apparently it’s quite common for a young horse’s mane to switch sides as they go through their training and favour one bend more than the other. Additionally, sometimes half the mane flips sides, which indicates neck dysfunction, and the muscles working incorrectly.

In this not particularly brilliant photo of Phoenix you can see that her mane is very much undecided which way it wants to go, and you can see the shorter part of her mane at the bottom goes fairly straight up.

I would say that observing the way the mane lies is not a foolproof way of identifying their supple side, because heavy breeds offen have so much mane it has to part down the middle, and rugs with necks encourage the mane onto one side or the other, and some people put a lot of effort into training the mane onto the off side. However, during a schooling session the mane will usually try to revert to it’s natural lay, as I observed whilst teaching last night. But having an understanding for the mane lay and the possible effect on the horse’s way of going, hopefully you can use your observations to successfully feed back into your training plan.

Exercise Boots

Otis wore protective boots for all forms of exercise, but in the last couple of years I’ve done a complete U-turn on my approach to leg protection.

It started when I was doing in hand and lunging work with Phoenix whilst heavily pregnant. She was barefoot and a clean mover and not in hard work. Plus I could hardly bend down to put boots on her. Then I just progressed to riding without brushing boots.

I put them on when we jump or go cross country, but as she’s still barefoot and shows no signs of knocking herself I haven’t used boots or bandages for the majority of her work.

My reason for moving away from leg protection was mainly the research that was coming to light about the problems caused by boots warming up tendons and having a negative effect on their tensile strength.

And I was quite happy with this simpler approach to riding, and confident in my reasoning. Until recently.

During lockdown Phoenix has progressed in her flatwork and is now working on collection, half pass in trot and canter, walk pirouettes, as well as doing direct transitions as the norm. I’ve recently started doubting my logic. But it’s a minefield nowadays trying to find the right leg protection.

The big downside to leg protection is that it heats up the legs so reduces rge functionality of the tendons. So boots need to be as lightweight and breathable as possible. However, the lighter the material, the less protection the boots will provide.

I wrestled with the pros and cons for each argument but finally decided that I’d never forgive myself if Phoenix knocked herself whilst dancing, causing a wound that would have been protected by lightweight boots.

The expert guidance on the subject of leg protection now is that they should only be on for the minimal length of time, should be as breathable as possible, and the legs should be cooled as quickly as possible after work. I also learnt a lot about the type of boots. A lot of dressage wraps are marketed as “supportive” but in reality, they offer very little support. And you don’t necessarily want support because if you restrict the movement of the fetlock the forces are transmitted to another joint in the leg, which could cause more injury. In terms of protection, boots either provide an armour like protection to stop injury from sharp objects, and others dissipate shock forces of a strike or impact. No boot does both forms of protection. For my situation, I want softer boots which won’t stop wounds from sharp objects but will reduce the effect of a knock as Phoenix is learning to dance Valegro style.

I’m still very much on the fence about using leg protection on a daily basis, because it isn’t a straightforward decision as we were taught a decade ago, but owners and riders have to weigh up the benefits of providing protection with the effect of heating up and weakening the tendons. And once your decision is made there is the challenge of finding the boot which provides a sufficient level of the correct type of protection whilst reducing the heating effect.

Life After Lockdown

Now that everyone is charging out the starting box as the restrictions on lockdown are being eased I’ve been pondering about how lockdown has changed us. What have we learnt from being forced to strip back our lives?

I think big office based businesses will change dramatically as they have experienced working from home, so will now have to offer more flexible working hours. Those who travel internationally for work, such as my brother, will have learnt to do much of their work remotely so I’m sure will continue to do as much as they can from base as whilst training an Australian company over Zoom may mean that you need to be in the office at 6am, it does at least mean you can sleep in your own bed that night. Both these factors will have a knock on effect on the environment with less commuting and fewer flights. Which I think will also change business dynamics.

But what about the smaller businesses or sole traders? I think they will come out of lockdown more resilient, with more strings to their bow, and have a better back up plan for the future – be it a planned period off work for scheduled surgery or the like, or nature preventing work taking place, for example. Shops have learnt to sell online, service providers have learnt to think outside the box. I for one never dreamt that there would be a market for remote riding lessons.

Socially, how are we changing? Well I think everyone is realising what activities they miss partaking in, and who they miss seeing, the most. When we’re set free I think people will be more selective about the groups or clubs they attend, and will limit themselves to fewer outings a week. From a parents perspective, an online catch-up is very appealing as I don’t have to worry about childcare. And I can also sit in my lounging clothes, and with no commute my social evening can start at 7.30pm rather than 8.30pm. Of course there’s no atmosphere, but if you’re wanting a chinwag then you can easily create an atmosphere by synchronising rounds of drinks. I don’t think Zoom quizzes or get-togethers will replace “going out out” to quote Micky Flanagan but they’ve definitely become a viable option in the social calendar.

Then of course are the changes lockdown has made to us as individuals. I feel that I’ve done things I’d have never thought I’d try during lockdown, and enjoyed doing unexpected things. I’m a workaholic and I would never have considered taking two weeks off work, let alone two months. Of course it hasn’t meant that I’ve lounged around on the sofa all day. I had a good clean and sort out of the house, filled the garage with things to take to the charity shop and tip, blitzed the garden, applied for planning permission, made my own fly spray, finished puzzle books which have been kicking around for years, tuned my harp, caught up on my reading, re-laid the loose bricks in the garden wall (with cement), replaced the toilet seat, repainted the porch. I’ve enjoyed turning my hand to the unusual tasks, but what surprised me most was actually how much I enjoyed our Groundhog Day. Up at 6.30am, a couple of hours at the yard riding and doing chores, then entertaining the toddler until a family lunch, cooked by my husband. Then more playtime with some jobs squeezed in around teddy bears picnics, before afternoon horse chores, toddler dinner, bedtime, my dinner, and some jobbing before bed. It’s been comfortingly familiar, and enjoyable, with enough variants that I can just about distinguish between days. Really, it feels like the summer holidays of childhood; when the days drift by hazily blending into one. Time seems to stand still, yet it’s flown by.

Of course I’m one of the lucky ones; we have a house and garden which gives much more variety to play than a flat, and we’ve not had the financial worries of some families. Yes, we can’t live this way indefinitely but it’s fine for the moment. And most importantly, we enjoy each others company.

Which led me to a quandary at the beginning of the week. Of course I don’t want lockdown to continue forever, but do I want to return to life in the fast lane? As clarifications were made within the equestrian industry as to the do’s and don’ts, I started to feel this pressure. Social media was full of venues advertising hire, coaches advertising lessons. I need to be eased gently back into training and going out so that I can plan trips sufficiently and get the most out of them. Equally, most of us have been doing less riding, or less jumping and fast work, than pre-lockdown, so we have to consider our horse’s fitness too. I thought Tweseldown made a very good statement that they would not open for a couple of weeks because everyone should start jumping and fittening their horses prior to hiring a cross country venue. It’s true!

What I realised is, that I’m selfish. I want the calm, family time that comes with lockdown, yet I yearn for the satisfaction of teaching and freedom to enjoy the fresh air and countryside.

I can’t return to full work yet as I don’t have childcare, so I have decided to start doing a handful of lessons each week, and during this transition to work, I am trying to work out how to reorganise my life to accommodate the best of both worlds. Since returning to work after maternity leave, my workload has grown and diversified in ways I never imagined. I lost a bit of control and ended up doing some sort of work every day. Which happens to all self employed people. Now is my chance to take back control. Rearrange my working week and as I start to book things in, remember to keep to my days off! It’s not that I will get rid of work, merely consolidate what I have and use my time more wisely. The same can be said for planning my weekends and down time. For if nothing else, lockdown has taught us about time and making it quality.

Make Your Own Fly Spray

I’ve considered making my own fly spray for a couple of years now, but never gotten around to it. However, my Mum tried and tested a recipe last year and was pleased with how effective it is. So with extra time on my hands this spring, I decided to give it a go.

Once I’d sourced the ingredients (mostly online) and bought two 1L spray bottles, it was fairly straightforward.

Ingredients

  • 225ml dettol
  • 250ml Avon skin so Soft (Dry oil spray)
  • 250 ml cider vinegar or white vinegar
  • 1 squirt of washing up liquid
  • 5ml citronella essential oil
  • 5ml lavender essential oil
  • 5 ml tea tree essential oil
  • 5ml neem oil.
  • Approximately 1250ml cold tea made from 6 tea bags.

It’s very simple, I mixed all the ingredients except for cold tea in a bowl and stirred them well, then I put half into each of my 1l spray bottles (one for each horse) and filled each up to the 1l mark with cold tea.

It smells quite similar to the shop bought ones, which is a relief, although darker in colour. You need to shake the bottle well before use, but otherwise it has the same application directions. I have heard that it is effective for sweet itch sufferers, so am hoping that it really helps Otis.

I’ve just done the calculations, and aside from the £6.99 one off cost for the bottles, the ingredients to make 2l of fly spray cost £10.95. we did however have white vinegar, washing up liquid, and tea bags in stock. So you can probably round that figure to £12 to safely include all ingredients.

A quick look online shows that you can pay at least £12 for a 500ml bottle of branded fly spray. For ease of comparison, including the cost of the two bottles, 500ml of fly spray costs £4.95 to make. It’s got to be worth trying it.

I’ll let you know how we get on!

Zig Zag Poles

Here’s another polework exercise for anyone needing some inspiration at the moment.

The Rubber Curry Comb

Here’s a little suppling exercise I did today, using a combination of poles and circles.

Beginning in walk, walk over the pole on the right, then walk a right hand circle. I worked on a fifteen metre circle as that is the smallest diameter that she can stay balanced on. From the circle, walk over the pole to the left of the first pole. Walk a left hand circle before walking over the pole adjacent to pole two before riding a right hand circle and finishing by riding over the most left hand pole.

The exercise can then be repeated in trot and eventually canter, with a flying change over each pole.

The aim of the exercise is to maintain the rhythm of the gait over each pole, and for the horse to step effortlessly over the pole without changing their stride length or posture, and for them to be…

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Spring Pasture Management 

With extra time on my hands, this year I’ve scarified the lawn to remove moss and dead grass – the equivalent of harrowing – applied a moss killer, and cut it short – the equivalents of topping?! – before liming it to increase the pH level and discourage future moss, and reseeding it. Hopefully in a month or so I’ll have a catalogue perfect lawn!
Has anyone else done their spring jobs in the fields this last couple of weeks?

The Rubber Curry Comb

Hopefully by now you’ve all had a hint of spring… some warm days, a bit of sunshine on your back, the daffodils and crocuses are decorating the verges, and the grass is growing.

So it’s time to turn our attention to looking after the paddocks.

As soon as the fields are dry enough to get a tractor or ATV (all terrain vehicle) on then it’s time to help the fields recover.

Fields, no matter how much grazing is restricted over winter, become poached so they need to be rolled. Rollers are heavy so there’s a fine line between the ground being too wet that the ground is compacted, and for it to be too dry that the poached areas aren’t flattened.

The other big job to do is harrowing. The harrow, which is like a large rake, aerates the soil, pulls up any dead grass and weeds, and encourages a…

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Life Under Lock and Key

It’s been almost two weeks of lockdown in the UK. It’s a strange new normal that I’m starting to accept.

When lockdown was announced I wasn’t hugely surprised, and in many respects it made some decisions for me; there was increasing talk about whether it was ethical to ride horses or teach and risk needing the emergency services. Childcare had stopped and I hadn’t worked out that logistical problem yet.

The first week went quite well; it was like Christmas but with better weather. It was a novelty, and actually time to take a breather and do some life admin. I planned some big jobs to do, and settled myself for some family time.

By the end of the second week, however, it’s beginning to feel like Groundhog Day. Each day Mallory and I go to the yard, ride and do chores like feed the chickens. Seeing very few people, but at least getting our exercise, fresh air, and sense of normality. I’m not sure Phoenix is as pleased about this as me, but her flatwork is coming on in leaps and bounds! Then we go home mid morning; lunch is as 12, and the afternoon is divided between playing, being in the garden, drawing, helping with jobs before tea and bed by 7. Then I can get some other jobs done.

There’s no way of distinguishing between days and it’s so easy to fall into a slump of depression and lose all motivation. After all, what is there to aim for if there’s nowhere to go and no one to show it to?

It’s looking increasingly likely that lockdown will be extended next week, and as I highly doubt kick-starting the equestrian industry will be high on their list, so I won’t be going back to work anytime soon. There’s nothing I can do about it, so there’s no point getting stressed about the situation, so I’ve accepted it.

But I do need to make some changes to help me cope with this new normal. Firstly, I need to differentiate between the days more, to better document the transition of time. I’m using Phoenix’s work to help. Polework on Tuesday, lunging on Wednesday, for example. Then I’m going to go back to doing Pilates on Mondays via video link. And find some other activities to do at home on specific days. And create a list of jobs around the house – those which are usually overlooked, and deemed unessential to fulfill my need to be productive. Then I have a few ideas for Pony Club – of activities the kids can do at home, of stable management lectures we can do remotely, and am rolling those out steadily. I’m completing my quiz and puzzle books, sorting out photos on my laptop, and reading the pile of books by my bed. I’m going to use this time to organise myself, as well as enjoy the time spent dressing up as superheroes, building Duplo, listening to Mallory’s echolalia expand her vocabulary as we count snails and pick daisies in the lawn.

And most of all, appreciate the fact that I’m one of the lucky ones. I’m on lockdown with people I love and like spending time with, we have a garden to escape from the indoors, we’re financially stable for the time being.

Workwise, what’s the plan? Who knows. The BHS is permitting remote teaching if a strict set of criteria are met. Which means that only a handful of clients qualify for it. There are the BHS Challenge Awards which can be taught remotely. However, the vibes I’m getting from everyone is that no one knows what the short term future holds, so are reluctant to commit to anything. Plus there is the uncertainty of job stability and finances, and the questionable moral of riding at the moment. I’m at the end of the phone to all my clients though, and am happy to put together exercise plans.

However, I can’t not have an income long term, so I need to think of alternative ways to earn money while this new normal continues. If not, I might actually get to the bottom of my job list and clean my car!

Pole Triangles

Another polework layout for anyone focusing on their flatwork at the moment.

The Rubber Curry Comb

This is a pole layout I did a few weeks ago now with clients, which had numerous exercises within it to benefit a wide range of horses and riders. Lay out a triangle of poles, then place a pole four foot away from each pole. Then build another triangle with outer poles next to it, so that there are three trotting poles in the centre.

The first exercise I used with my riders was in their warm up, getting them to trot and canter between a pair of poles. This really helped identify any crookedness in the horse, and encouraged the riders to minimise their inside rein aids. Initially, I only had them riding through one pair of poles but towards the end of the warm up I got some riders to ride an arc through the two tramlines on one side of the formation, a bit like a shallow…

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