Life Under Lock and Key

It’s been almost two weeks of lockdown in the UK. It’s a strange new normal that I’m starting to accept.

When lockdown was announced I wasn’t hugely surprised, and in many respects it made some decisions for me; there was increasing talk about whether it was ethical to ride horses or teach and risk needing the emergency services. Childcare had stopped and I hadn’t worked out that logistical problem yet.

The first week went quite well; it was like Christmas but with better weather. It was a novelty, and actually time to take a breather and do some life admin. I planned some big jobs to do, and settled myself for some family time.

By the end of the second week, however, it’s beginning to feel like Groundhog Day. Each day Mallory and I go to the yard, ride and do chores like feed the chickens. Seeing very few people, but at least getting our exercise, fresh air, and sense of normality. I’m not sure Phoenix is as pleased about this as me, but her flatwork is coming on in leaps and bounds! Then we go home mid morning; lunch is as 12, and the afternoon is divided between playing, being in the garden, drawing, helping with jobs before tea and bed by 7. Then I can get some other jobs done.

There’s no way of distinguishing between days and it’s so easy to fall into a slump of depression and lose all motivation. After all, what is there to aim for if there’s nowhere to go and no one to show it to?

It’s looking increasingly likely that lockdown will be extended next week, and as I highly doubt kick-starting the equestrian industry will be high on their list, so I won’t be going back to work anytime soon. There’s nothing I can do about it, so there’s no point getting stressed about the situation, so I’ve accepted it.

But I do need to make some changes to help me cope with this new normal. Firstly, I need to differentiate between the days more, to better document the transition of time. I’m using Phoenix’s work to help. Polework on Tuesday, lunging on Wednesday, for example. Then I’m going to go back to doing Pilates on Mondays via video link. And find some other activities to do at home on specific days. And create a list of jobs around the house – those which are usually overlooked, and deemed unessential to fulfill my need to be productive. Then I have a few ideas for Pony Club – of activities the kids can do at home, of stable management lectures we can do remotely, and am rolling those out steadily. I’m completing my quiz and puzzle books, sorting out photos on my laptop, and reading the pile of books by my bed. I’m going to use this time to organise myself, as well as enjoy the time spent dressing up as superheroes, building Duplo, listening to Mallory’s echolalia expand her vocabulary as we count snails and pick daisies in the lawn.

And most of all, appreciate the fact that I’m one of the lucky ones. I’m on lockdown with people I love and like spending time with, we have a garden to escape from the indoors, we’re financially stable for the time being.

Workwise, what’s the plan? Who knows. The BHS is permitting remote teaching if a strict set of criteria are met. Which means that only a handful of clients qualify for it. There are the BHS Challenge Awards which can be taught remotely. However, the vibes I’m getting from everyone is that no one knows what the short term future holds, so are reluctant to commit to anything. Plus there is the uncertainty of job stability and finances, and the questionable moral of riding at the moment. I’m at the end of the phone to all my clients though, and am happy to put together exercise plans.

However, I can’t not have an income long term, so I need to think of alternative ways to earn money while this new normal continues. If not, I might actually get to the bottom of my job list and clean my car!

Pole Triangles

Another polework layout for anyone focusing on their flatwork at the moment.

The Rubber Curry Comb

This is a pole layout I did a few weeks ago now with clients, which had numerous exercises within it to benefit a wide range of horses and riders. Lay out a triangle of poles, then place a pole four foot away from each pole. Then build another triangle with outer poles next to it, so that there are three trotting poles in the centre.

The first exercise I used with my riders was in their warm up, getting them to trot and canter between a pair of poles. This really helped identify any crookedness in the horse, and encouraged the riders to minimise their inside rein aids. Initially, I only had them riding through one pair of poles but towards the end of the warm up I got some riders to ride an arc through the two tramlines on one side of the formation, a bit like a shallow…

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How The Horses Have Wintered

After a couple of false starts, spring feels like it’s properly arrived. I’ve seen baby lambs and daffodils, mown the lawn, and the horses are moulting!

It’s the perfect time to assess how your horse is coming out of the winter. I’m really pleased with how Otis is looking; he wore a lightweight rug from Christmas until the beginning of March, when the storms stopped beating Britain. I took it off promptly so I could maximise his time naked before his sweet itch rug goes on. He still has a daily hard feed of chaff and they’re in their winter field currently. The summer field is ready for them, but we’re waiting for the ground to dry up so they don’t poach the ground too much. Then all hard feed will stop, they can eat the grass that is already there then eat the new grass as it comes up.

Condition wise, Otis is looking slightly ribby. I can just about see his ribs, but given that he is coming into spring,a native breed, and unable to be ridden, this is how I want him to be. He will put weight on as soon as they go into their summer paddock and I’ve limited the risk of laminitis as much as possible.

Phoenix, on the other hand, has a little too much weight. But given that she is stabled overnight I’d expect her to carry more weight than Otis. She is still having hay in the field, but that will hopefully be reduced in coming weeks as the grass starts to come through. She’s pretty fit though, so I’m not overly concerned as I will just ensure that her workload continues. Her hard feed can be cut back soon, and she won’t go into her summer field for a few weeks anyway, so I have time to trim her tummy a bit more. I do feel she’s bulked out over the winter, as her neck has really muscles up recently, and she’s much stronger in her hindquarters.

She’s had her first season of the year, which like last year was a bit more emotional than her summer seasons, but because she’s more established I have so many more buttons to play around with, which helps settle her and makes her more rideable, I only had a couple of bad rides. She’s also fitter, stronger, has a better relationship with me, and is happier in her routine, which all helps.

How has everyone else’s horses come out of the winter?

Lockdown!

Monday evening we all sat down and watched the latest news update on covid19. The UK went into lockdown. I had very mixed feelings about the situation. Over the weekend I’d been wrestling over the question of if I should be continuing to go to work. It’s outdoors, I don’t get too close to clients, exercise is being encouraged, I was following the hygeine recommendations … but everyone is being encouraged to stay home, it’s a leisure activity so not vital to the UK’s functionality, and although I don’t get up close and personal I still see a good number of people each day. But on the flip side, as a self employed individual if I’m not working then I’m not earning anything.

I’d seen online that a few coaches had decided to stop teaching from Monday because of the amount of social contact, and because horse riding is a high risk sport and they didn’t want to put more pressure on the emergency services with accidents.

Part of me was glad that the decision was made for me, but I did not relish the idea of three weeks of isolation with an energetic toddler and no income! I have never been so glad to see the sunshine and to have a garden to stop cabin fever setting in.

I’ve seen some coaches offering remote teaching – where you send in a video of you riding – a test or exercise – and they feedback to you. Others are advocating no riding at all, and others have disappeared off the face of the Earth – a well deserved sabbatical perhaps?

I’ve decided that I will offer to draw up exercise plans for my clients if they want. Basically give them a brief overview of what I was intending to focus on in their next few lessons. List points I want them to focus on, such as their position, and provide flatwork and polework exercises which build on recent lessons.

My brother also gave me the idea, or at least caused me to remember, that I am qualified to teach the BHS Challenge Awards, and some of those can be taught remotely, so I will get myself organised to offer that. Then I will occupy myself planning some remote teaching for Pony Club (I have grandiose ideas of wordsearches, quizzes, posters, and models – sorry, parents!) and then enjoying some time with Phoenix (at the moment the joy of a DIY yard is that we still need to care for the horses so it is our daily exercise and much needed change of scenery), spending quality time with my family, and starting that list of house and garden jobs which never get done. I will also try to blog a variety of exercises for anyone who is still riding. Personally, I need to keep riding for my own sanity, and I feel Phoenix is better off in work. But we’ll be playing safe and mostly working on her flatwork. But I understand why some have decided not to ride their horse. It’s a fine line between looking after your physical and mental health and staying safe.

I made a list of goals that I would like to achieve during this lockdown to help keep me motivated, because it’s amazing how slippery the slope is spiralling into slovenliness.

  1. Establish walk to canter transitions. We’ve almost nailed them, they just need a little refining.
  2. Develop her travers and trot half pass. I only introduced them in the last month so they are very much work in progress.
  3. Focus on encouraging Phoenix to work in a longer and lower frame, to help her learn to stretch more.
  4. Introduce canter to walk transitions.
  5. Tidy up Phoenix’s mane and tail, and also need to give her a much needed bath.
  6. Sort out all equine things that are in the garage and hopefully consolidate it. Anything which can be sold on will be put aside for a later date.
  7. Clean out the trailer. I was hoping to pressure wash it, but that may have to wait until restrictions are lifted slightly, but I will do what I can.
  8. Do all the spring gardening jobs and then the extra jobs, like pressure washing the patios and drive.
  9. Have a good sort out and tidy up of every room in the house.
  10. Clean my car inside and out. (This one is for if I’m really bored!)


How is everyone else planning on spending their lockdown?

Quarantine Preparations

Following on from my last post about how I think it’s important that we all remain calm, behave sensibly, and remember to look after our emotional health – which invariably means lots of pony time. We still need to prepare for the worst case scenario – you going into quarantine and not being able to care for your horse.

The quarantine period is for fourteen days, so you want to stock the feed room for that duration. Be sensible, if you aren’t riding then your horse will be out of work, or in a reduced workload, so would benefit from a reduction in their hard feed. Especially with spring around the corner and many still living in at night.

Order enough feed to last for two or three weeks and keep on top of it. There’s no need to panic buy, but you don’t want to run low on stores. In a worst case scenario, a friend can pick up a bag of feed should your horse run out while you’re in quarantine. The same goes for forage and bedding. Don’t panic buy, but stock up.

It’s a good idea for every owner to write down their horse’s needs – contact phone numbers, feed quantities, rug requirements, daily routine – and share it with those who will look after your horse should you go into quarantine. Some small yards will share these details throughout; other yards might prefer small groups of friends or field friends to sort themselves out. Ultimately it’s what works best for your horse – some horses can’t be caught by everyone for example. In which case, it would be better for one person to take over the care rather than everyone muck in quasi-randomly.

Make sure you’re ready for spring – are the lightweight and fly rugs at the yard and ready for use? If most of the yard goes down, will the horses be turned out 24/7? Or have a more relaxed routine? In which case, will they need different rugs?

If you have a private yard, or there’s only a couple of owners there it is worth speaking to a freelance groom. Brief them and have them on standby should you need to be isolated.

It’s worth having a chat to your farrier, vet, chiropractor, and anyone else who might be visiting your yard. Check that they’re happy to come still, and what precautions they are taking and those they require you to make. I’ve seen some farriers request that owners don’t hold their horse’s unless necessary, or even aren’t present, and many are asking that you pay online rather than in cash. These people are usually self-employed so need to work as much as possible to protect their livelihood. Which means they will take the necessary precautions to protect themselves, but we should also take responsibility and not expose them unnecessarily by respecting their wishes and not being present if you suspect you have the symptoms.

With those simple procedures in place your horse will barely notice your absence! And, to be honest, it didn’t take much effort did it?

Times A Changing

The last thirty six hours has thrown the British equine world into disarray. Covid-19 has been coming a while, infringing on all areas of our lives, but now we’ve moved into unchartered territory.

We’d discussed it at Pony Club and Riding Club – talking about reducing the risk of infection at events and providing hand washing facilities. But it was business as normal with just a couple of adjustments to our routines.

However, on Monday the PM released a statement bringing more stringent methods into daily life – minimising social contact, reducing unnecessary travel, self isolating. This was closely followed by statements from British Eventing and Pony Club stating that all competition and training has been suspended. On Tuesday, British Dressage, British Showjumping, and British Riding clubs followed suit.

It’s incredible to think that there will be no equine competitions for the majority of this year, and is very disappointing for those who rely on it professionally, and who plan their training with a particular competition goal in mind.

Disappointing as it is, at least we are still allowed to ride. Italy has banned riding and high risk sports to reduce the number of accidents needing treatment in their overstretched hospitals. Phoenix was going to have a go at her first novice test this weekend. No matter; we will keep up the training so that she will be working at elementary level by the summer, and I’m still able to take her out schooling to get some cross country practice in and keep up her jumping training. The important thing is to find some alternative goals and aims to keep us motivated and to keep spirits up.

I made the suggestion to my riding club committee, that we should run our spring dressage competitions online. It’s not the same as going out to a competition, but it’s better than nothing and I think there will be lots of interest. Of course clinics are also being cancelled, so I think we will have to put our heads together to come up with some challenges we can give to members to help everyone keep in touch and motivated. Perhaps get everyone to share a photo or talk about their riding that day. There’s no restrictions on hacking, so perhaps we should make a hacking challenge?

With the Pony Club, I already have some ideas for the kids. They’re going to have a lot of extra time on their hands, so it would be good to give them some ridden exercises – a bit like online lessons – or stable management quizzes to keep up their knowledge. I’m keen that those working towards an efficiency test don’t regress or lose motivation due to tests being delayed and training cancelled. But we’re going to let everyone acclimatise to this new, strange normal, and then get our thinking caps on.

I judge for Demi Dressage – an online dressage competition for under 16s – and I think that will become really popular in the coming months, as a way to focus children on developing their riding. Already I’ve seen more and more online competitions cropping up, including jumping competitions. They’ve been in the pipeline for a while I think, but this current climate has brought them to the fore.

Finding the fun that we can do safely, will help us survive the emotional challenges the coronavirus brings. We’re lucky that equestrianism is an outdoor activity as even if competition venues close, we still have our riding areas at home.

With everyone being encouraged to work from home, I was starting to dread enforced time with an energetic toddler in an enclosed space. But we’re lucky enough to have a garden at least, and I’ve drawn myself up a list of jobs to do. Regardless of any quarantining, we will be spending more time at home, so it’s an ideal time to do the jobs you never get around to doing. Maybe that room will get painted, and the garden will be perfectly manicured?! Or perhaps we’ll actually eat those emergency tins of soup at the back of the cupboard?

I was very relieved when the BHS released a statement saying that coaches should continue to work where possible. I only interact with fit and healthy people outdoors, not getting too close to them; and by following the suggested hygeine and social distancing guidelines, as well as both sides reacting to the first symptoms, the risk should be minimal.

I think it’s important to maintain as much of a normal life as possible for our own sanity, whilst being sensible and sensitive to the situation. Of course, my work may not be vital to the infrastructure of the country, but horses are many people’s saviours. Their down time in a busy world; the thing which turns their day from doom and gloom to sun and laughter. Their coping mechanism for the rest of their life. It’s easy to overlook the importance of a good riding session (or any exercise) to someone’s mental health.

Just like many hobbies; gym classes, book clubs, sports clubs, social clubs. Not only do the clients need these to balance out their lives, but those who run them need the financial reward in order to feed their families. So yes, let’s reduce close contact with others, but in a world where everything’s at a click of a button, let’s make sure we continue to stay in touch with ingenious ways. Summer is coming; move clubs outdoors if possible; use online videos, conference calls, and social media to keep this side of life going.

It’s the start of a new normal, which will take some adjusting to, but hopefully by everyone being sensible (you’ve bought all your toilet roll now, haven’t you?!) and by keeping an eye out for others (we don’t know many at risk people locally, but I’ve offered to organise online shopping for my Granny, and plan to send her bits and pieces in the post over the next few months as well as regular emails to stop her feeling so isolated), we will survive.

Control

At the Pony Club conference I attended in February I picked up lots of useful hints and tips. One useful thing that Paul Tapner said, was that when he was young and went off to be taught by top level instructors for months at a time he would put aside everything that he knew and unquestioningly lap up everything he was told. He wouldn’t forget his previous knowledge, but it was filed away until after the training when he would piece together all of his knowledge. When teaching, you want your students to do exactly what you say, not harp back to what a previous adult has told them because it may not be an appropriate tactic or exercise for that day. I took that approach with the conference, writing down everything that was said, regardless of my initial reaction. Later, I could reflect on my notes and use my previous knowledge and experience to develop my own opinion and approach. For example, I liked the fact that when the demo riders (all Pony Clubbers) were told to halt they did immediately. This has safety benefits and shows respect for their instructor, but I didn’t like how it caused them to pull hard on the reins in an attempt to get a direct transition. So I will try a modified approach when I next teach a group of children.

Anyway, one quote which I’ve taken from the beginning of the day is:

It is the coach’s job to control the rider and the rider’s job to control the pony.

Basically, when you learn to ride you learn to control your horse or pony, be it at the lowest level of steering around the edge of an arena, keeping in trot, or at the highest level of controlling the size of circles, pirouettes, degree of lateral movements, and the precise speed of the gaits. At whatever level I’m teaching at, if the rider can perform an exercise or movement competently, they have mastered control at that level.

I taught a new rider this week, only a little girl, with her own pony. She’s had trouble learning to canter, is now feeling nervous and has had a couple of gentle tumbles to boot.

I started her off in walk and trot, assessing her steering and knowledge of school movements, trot diagonals, changesof rein etc, and her pony was very sweet. Forwards but without being sharp, but as we went through the warm up the pony started getting faster and doing a turbo trot. It wasn’t an accelerating movement, just a huge striding gait with a set neck. Then of course, her rider began to get worried. She told me that the reason she didn’t like cantering was because of the speed.

It struck me that the crux of their problem is that the rider doesn’t feel in control of her pony, and therefore lacks confidence and doesn’t feel safe, and the pony (whilst not being naughty) was taking the opportunity to take control of the speed.

I brought them into the middle of the school and put her stirrups up a hole to give her leg a bit more security and so she had something to brace her feet against when we did step two. I then explained to her how to squeeze and release the reins rather than take a static pull so her pony didn’t lean on her hands. Finally, I showed her how to bend her elbows and use her shoulders and upper body to half halt down the reins, and to stabilise her upper body. As with a lot of people, when a pony pulls down the arms go forward, elbows straighten, and upper body tips forward. This is not a strong position, and the pony has the upper hand. By using her upper body to support her rein aids the pony cannot pull her forwards and put her position into jeopardy. Because the pony is not going to like this new, stronger approach from her rider, she will argue for a few strides, which is where the slightly shorter stirrups will help keep her rider in place. I put in some trigger words; “strong tummy”, “squeeze, release” and “elbows” so that I could quickly correct my rider and help her regain control because each phrase meant an action to her.

My rider asked to go on the lunge, so I obliged, if only that knowing I was at the end of the lunge line gave her the confidence to stand her ground with her slowing aids. We talked about how their normal trot was a level five, and a slow trot was a level four, whilst turbo trot was a six. We wanted a five trot, or sometimes a four, the majority of the time.

She set off in trot, and in all fairness to her, the lunge line was slack as I didn’t really need to do anything. The pony went off into a five trot, so we practiced her strong tummy and squeezing rein aids to slow to a four trot. The pony tried to set against her rider but once she realised she wasn’t going to budge, the pony came back nicely to her. We did this transition a couple of times and then the pony decided to turbo trot. But my rider reacted quicker to the acceleration, so nipping it in the bud, and become she gave firmer, more decisive aids, after a few her pony came back nicely. We repeated this on the lunge in both directions and once my rider had earnt her pony’s respect, she got a reaction from her first, milder aid.

As my rider started to feel in control, she grew in confidence and happily agreed to canter on the lunge. Although the pony doesn’t tank off in the canter, she has a big stride and it can feel uncontrolled to someone not yet in sync with her, so I needed to know that my rider felt she could stop her pony at any time. Without hanging off her mouth of course! I ran through the downwards aids and then they cantered. I didn’t have to do anything in the middle, and after a few transitions back to trot my rider began to feel more comfortable about cantering and could start to relax.

To finish the lesson, they went off the lunge and practiced riding with a strong tummy and firm, clear rein aids, using her upper body to support. The pony anticipated cantering, tried to turbo trot, but my rider applied her aids and sat perfectly upright and balanced until her pony came back to her in a few strides. We used transitions within trot to improve control, and within minutes her pony had stopped testing her, instead responding to her first aid.

This meant that my rider could ride a more energetic trot without the speed, and relaxed into her riding. She felt in control.

Of course, they’re going to have to repeat this conversation a few times for the pony to really accept her newly bossy rider, and for this little girl to learn to correct their speed before it reaches turbo level. And for it to become second nature. Having a contingency plan as well as buzz words really help build confidence and make a proactive rider. We might not have got her cantering independently, but I’m sure she will once she feels that she’s in full control.

Mud! Mud! Glorious Mud!

With yet another storm about to hit Britain, we have had the wettest winter since, well, forever! But what does all this rain mean for our horses?

I feel very lucky in that Otis’s field has minimal mud, so he and his friends have been happy all winter, with no concern about mud fever, tendon injury etc. Phoenix’s field isn’t so good, but even so it’s only pastern deep at the gateway. Some fields are knee deep in mud, and only last week I saw horses being evacuated from their field which was so submerged that only the top rail of fencing was visible!

So what problems are you likely to encounter with muddy fields? Firstly, the obvious problem of mud fever. Some horses are more susceptible to it than others, and once a horse has had mud fever they are more likely to get it again. How can you prevent mud fever? How long is a piece of string?

The bacteria involved in mud fever thrive on damp, warm conditions. For example, a muddy field! The best preventative is to avoid the muddy field, but this winter it is nigh on impossible. So drying the legs regularly, giving time off the mud is important. I don’t think horses with heavy feathering should have their legs clipped as it gives some protection, however if they develop mud fever it can be hard to treat with all the hair.

The next big problem that I’ve seen a lot of these last few months are field injuries. Either pulled tendons from the deep going, or slip injuries where a horse loses their footing and jars themselves, or they slide over in the field, or they do the splits. The injuries associated with slippery ground can affect the muscles of the back, hindquarters, shoulders or legs. Basically all over! In particular, the sacroiliac area is often damaged by horses slipping around, and pulling themselves through deep, heavy mud. The only real preventative is to avoid the deep going in the first place, but if you can’t then sectioning off the deepest area of the field, for example the gateway, so that at least the horses aren’t trotting or cantering through the deep mud. Checking legs daily for any signs of heat or swelling, and if your horse starts to behave abnormally (such as today’s client who fidgeted and fussed when I put the saddle on, and we believe he’s tweaked his back) then rest them and call the physiotherapist, chiropractor or whoever usually manipulates your horse. They will identify sore spots and be able to ease it if it’s been caught early enough, or refer to the vet for further diagnosis.

Some yards have stopped turn out completely for the moment, and it’s a hard balance to find between looking after the land and not wrecking it for spring, and ensuring the horses stay emotionally happy and healthy. I think it’s a balance between exercising horses sufficiently that they do not feel the need to gallop around their fields, so doing more damage to the land, and if they are staying in that day they they get out for a leg stretch at least twice. And not having miserable horses standing all day in the mud because if they’re standing there miserably, they might as well be standing in their stable! I’ve found that letting your horse guide you is the best; yesterday I rode first thing in the sleet and Phoenix didn’t seem overly keen to go out, so I gave her some hay and left her munching for an hour while I rode another horse, and likewise if she’s standing at the gate at 2pm there’s no point leaving her there for another 3 hours.

What can we learn from this winter for the future, in terms of your routine, or field management? Firstly it’s important to be critical of yourself: is your winter grazing the driest bit of land? And if not, change it! Winter grazing needs to have good drainage; it could be your most uphill piece of land, or have empty ditches on the perimeter to aid drainage. The type of grass also is important too, but I’m no expert on field management so I’ll leave that subject before I get in too deep. Could your gateways be improved? By laying hardcore if possible, or those grass mats. Is the gate in the best place? Can you use two gateways to reduce footfall and damage to the gateway and to reduce the likelihood of horses standing at the gateway expecting their next feed.

Next, it’s important to consider which horses you have in the paddock. Big horses, or heavy horses do more damage to the land because they sink down into the mud, so destabilising the land. Small, finer ponies do less damage, so they might be better in your field which doesn’t drain as well. The number of horses is also important to consider. There’s the guideline of one acre per horse, but this acre must be very fertile, have good grass and sward, and only have a 14.2hh grazing it. Who probably lives in overnight. Bigger horses need more space, and when there’s less grazing because of the time of year and the mud horses in general need more space. So if you have five acres, you don’t really want any more that two big horses in, or four small ponies in winter. The ratio may need to change in the spring and summer as ponies notoriously need less grass to avoid laminitis, in which case you might put those four ponies onto three acres, and those two big horses onto four acres. Roughly speaking anyway. The moral of the story is to have the ratio right for winter and adjust it accordingly in the summer, rather than have too many equines for your space in the winter.

I think everyone has some lessons to learn from this winter about preparing and managing their fields ready for next year, and we’ll all be busy come the spring repairing the damage to our winter paddocks; be it blown over fencing from the high winds, or the fact that fields more closely resemble a ploughed field than a grazing area. It’s been a tough winter for all horse owners, but we should try to take the problems of this year on board so that we can make improvements for next year.

A Change of Lifestyle

One of my client’s ponies has always struggled with her weight. She has too much of it!

They were doing everything right; soaking her hay, minimal hard feed, exercise, restricted grazing, but after an injury and enforced rest over the summer this plump pony was even plumper!

We started her rehab, and although she started to lose a bit of weight but then she plateaued and as winter approached it was a stalemate. Something had to change before spring, when she might actually explode on the sugary grass!

The mare needed more exercise; canter work specifically but in order to do that post injury she needed a different arena surface to work on, and it being winter they needed more dark evening friendly facilities. So they found another yard, with an arena that wasn’t as deep as her current one, and with very good floodlighting, which meant she could be ridden every evening, and the work could be faster and more intensive. More polework and jumping could then be reintroduced. With faster workouts, and more frequent ones, she will increase in muscle tone, posture, and burn off fat.

Her routine was also changed as they went onto a DIY yard, so she was turned out earlier in the morning and caught in later. This totals an extra three hours out in the field. This might not be so great in spring or summer, but on a winter paddock it’s three hours more of wandering around, nibbling at grass, rather than those three hours spent stationary, demolishing a haynet. This means she requires less soaked hay as her nights are shorter, and I think it’s had a surprisingly strong effect on her losing weight.

With the change of yard there is of course a change in the hay and type of grass in the paddocks. The grazing is slightly poorer, but this suits a good doer, and has a higher percentage of grass in it rather than her previous field, which had a lot of clover in. Clover is rich in nitrogen and very fattening. I think this will have more of an impact in the spring and summer. I think the hay the little mare is now fed is of a similar nutritional value to before, and it is still soaked overnight so I don’t think the forage has affected her weight.

In the two months since moving to their new yard, the pony has become much fitter, improved muscle tone, and has improved in posture, which will hopefully mean that she is less likely to injure herself. Her good muscles have improved, so she has a topline. The weight has literally dropped off her; she’s gone from the bottom hole on each side of the girth to top hole and it still being loose!

Before Christmas…
… today.

I find it amazing the way a couple of changes – increased workload and reduced time chomping in the stable – have had such a huge impact on this mare’s weight. I feel much happier heading into spring with her and less concerned about laminitis, as I feel we will be able to control her weight more easily. I also think that she will be finding the ridden work far easier carrying less weight,which will only improve her performance.

It does make you realise that if you struggle to get the weight off your horse then increasing workload and increasing turnout on minimal grazing but plenty of space, is paramount to the weight loss journey.