Lockdown!

Monday evening we all sat down and watched the latest news update on covid19. The UK went into lockdown. I had very mixed feelings about the situation. Over the weekend I’d been wrestling over the question of if I should be continuing to go to work. It’s outdoors, I don’t get too close to clients, exercise is being encouraged, I was following the hygeine recommendations … but everyone is being encouraged to stay home, it’s a leisure activity so not vital to the UK’s functionality, and although I don’t get up close and personal I still see a good number of people each day. But on the flip side, as a self employed individual if I’m not working then I’m not earning anything.

I’d seen online that a few coaches had decided to stop teaching from Monday because of the amount of social contact, and because horse riding is a high risk sport and they didn’t want to put more pressure on the emergency services with accidents.

Part of me was glad that the decision was made for me, but I did not relish the idea of three weeks of isolation with an energetic toddler and no income! I have never been so glad to see the sunshine and to have a garden to stop cabin fever setting in.

I’ve seen some coaches offering remote teaching – where you send in a video of you riding – a test or exercise – and they feedback to you. Others are advocating no riding at all, and others have disappeared off the face of the Earth – a well deserved sabbatical perhaps?

I’ve decided that I will offer to draw up exercise plans for my clients if they want. Basically give them a brief overview of what I was intending to focus on in their next few lessons. List points I want them to focus on, such as their position, and provide flatwork and polework exercises which build on recent lessons.

My brother also gave me the idea, or at least caused me to remember, that I am qualified to teach the BHS Challenge Awards, and some of those can be taught remotely, so I will get myself organised to offer that. Then I will occupy myself planning some remote teaching for Pony Club (I have grandiose ideas of wordsearches, quizzes, posters, and models – sorry, parents!) and then enjoying some time with Phoenix (at the moment the joy of a DIY yard is that we still need to care for the horses so it is our daily exercise and much needed change of scenery), spending quality time with my family, and starting that list of house and garden jobs which never get done. I will also try to blog a variety of exercises for anyone who is still riding. Personally, I need to keep riding for my own sanity, and I feel Phoenix is better off in work. But we’ll be playing safe and mostly working on her flatwork. But I understand why some have decided not to ride their horse. It’s a fine line between looking after your physical and mental health and staying safe.

I made a list of goals that I would like to achieve during this lockdown to help keep me motivated, because it’s amazing how slippery the slope is spiralling into slovenliness.

  1. Establish walk to canter transitions. We’ve almost nailed them, they just need a little refining.
  2. Develop her travers and trot half pass. I only introduced them in the last month so they are very much work in progress.
  3. Focus on encouraging Phoenix to work in a longer and lower frame, to help her learn to stretch more.
  4. Introduce canter to walk transitions.
  5. Tidy up Phoenix’s mane and tail, and also need to give her a much needed bath.
  6. Sort out all equine things that are in the garage and hopefully consolidate it. Anything which can be sold on will be put aside for a later date.
  7. Clean out the trailer. I was hoping to pressure wash it, but that may have to wait until restrictions are lifted slightly, but I will do what I can.
  8. Do all the spring gardening jobs and then the extra jobs, like pressure washing the patios and drive.
  9. Have a good sort out and tidy up of every room in the house.
  10. Clean my car inside and out. (This one is for if I’m really bored!)


How is everyone else planning on spending their lockdown?

Quarantine Preparations

Following on from my last post about how I think it’s important that we all remain calm, behave sensibly, and remember to look after our emotional health – which invariably means lots of pony time. We still need to prepare for the worst case scenario – you going into quarantine and not being able to care for your horse.

The quarantine period is for fourteen days, so you want to stock the feed room for that duration. Be sensible, if you aren’t riding then your horse will be out of work, or in a reduced workload, so would benefit from a reduction in their hard feed. Especially with spring around the corner and many still living in at night.

Order enough feed to last for two or three weeks and keep on top of it. There’s no need to panic buy, but you don’t want to run low on stores. In a worst case scenario, a friend can pick up a bag of feed should your horse run out while you’re in quarantine. The same goes for forage and bedding. Don’t panic buy, but stock up.

It’s a good idea for every owner to write down their horse’s needs – contact phone numbers, feed quantities, rug requirements, daily routine – and share it with those who will look after your horse should you go into quarantine. Some small yards will share these details throughout; other yards might prefer small groups of friends or field friends to sort themselves out. Ultimately it’s what works best for your horse – some horses can’t be caught by everyone for example. In which case, it would be better for one person to take over the care rather than everyone muck in quasi-randomly.

Make sure you’re ready for spring – are the lightweight and fly rugs at the yard and ready for use? If most of the yard goes down, will the horses be turned out 24/7? Or have a more relaxed routine? In which case, will they need different rugs?

If you have a private yard, or there’s only a couple of owners there it is worth speaking to a freelance groom. Brief them and have them on standby should you need to be isolated.

It’s worth having a chat to your farrier, vet, chiropractor, and anyone else who might be visiting your yard. Check that they’re happy to come still, and what precautions they are taking and those they require you to make. I’ve seen some farriers request that owners don’t hold their horse’s unless necessary, or even aren’t present, and many are asking that you pay online rather than in cash. These people are usually self-employed so need to work as much as possible to protect their livelihood. Which means they will take the necessary precautions to protect themselves, but we should also take responsibility and not expose them unnecessarily by respecting their wishes and not being present if you suspect you have the symptoms.

With those simple procedures in place your horse will barely notice your absence! And, to be honest, it didn’t take much effort did it?

Times A Changing

The last thirty six hours has thrown the British equine world into disarray. Covid-19 has been coming a while, infringing on all areas of our lives, but now we’ve moved into unchartered territory.

We’d discussed it at Pony Club and Riding Club – talking about reducing the risk of infection at events and providing hand washing facilities. But it was business as normal with just a couple of adjustments to our routines.

However, on Monday the PM released a statement bringing more stringent methods into daily life – minimising social contact, reducing unnecessary travel, self isolating. This was closely followed by statements from British Eventing and Pony Club stating that all competition and training has been suspended. On Tuesday, British Dressage, British Showjumping, and British Riding clubs followed suit.

It’s incredible to think that there will be no equine competitions for the majority of this year, and is very disappointing for those who rely on it professionally, and who plan their training with a particular competition goal in mind.

Disappointing as it is, at least we are still allowed to ride. Italy has banned riding and high risk sports to reduce the number of accidents needing treatment in their overstretched hospitals. Phoenix was going to have a go at her first novice test this weekend. No matter; we will keep up the training so that she will be working at elementary level by the summer, and I’m still able to take her out schooling to get some cross country practice in and keep up her jumping training. The important thing is to find some alternative goals and aims to keep us motivated and to keep spirits up.

I made the suggestion to my riding club committee, that we should run our spring dressage competitions online. It’s not the same as going out to a competition, but it’s better than nothing and I think there will be lots of interest. Of course clinics are also being cancelled, so I think we will have to put our heads together to come up with some challenges we can give to members to help everyone keep in touch and motivated. Perhaps get everyone to share a photo or talk about their riding that day. There’s no restrictions on hacking, so perhaps we should make a hacking challenge?

With the Pony Club, I already have some ideas for the kids. They’re going to have a lot of extra time on their hands, so it would be good to give them some ridden exercises – a bit like online lessons – or stable management quizzes to keep up their knowledge. I’m keen that those working towards an efficiency test don’t regress or lose motivation due to tests being delayed and training cancelled. But we’re going to let everyone acclimatise to this new, strange normal, and then get our thinking caps on.

I judge for Demi Dressage – an online dressage competition for under 16s – and I think that will become really popular in the coming months, as a way to focus children on developing their riding. Already I’ve seen more and more online competitions cropping up, including jumping competitions. They’ve been in the pipeline for a while I think, but this current climate has brought them to the fore.

Finding the fun that we can do safely, will help us survive the emotional challenges the coronavirus brings. We’re lucky that equestrianism is an outdoor activity as even if competition venues close, we still have our riding areas at home.

With everyone being encouraged to work from home, I was starting to dread enforced time with an energetic toddler in an enclosed space. But we’re lucky enough to have a garden at least, and I’ve drawn myself up a list of jobs to do. Regardless of any quarantining, we will be spending more time at home, so it’s an ideal time to do the jobs you never get around to doing. Maybe that room will get painted, and the garden will be perfectly manicured?! Or perhaps we’ll actually eat those emergency tins of soup at the back of the cupboard?

I was very relieved when the BHS released a statement saying that coaches should continue to work where possible. I only interact with fit and healthy people outdoors, not getting too close to them; and by following the suggested hygeine and social distancing guidelines, as well as both sides reacting to the first symptoms, the risk should be minimal.

I think it’s important to maintain as much of a normal life as possible for our own sanity, whilst being sensible and sensitive to the situation. Of course, my work may not be vital to the infrastructure of the country, but horses are many people’s saviours. Their down time in a busy world; the thing which turns their day from doom and gloom to sun and laughter. Their coping mechanism for the rest of their life. It’s easy to overlook the importance of a good riding session (or any exercise) to someone’s mental health.

Just like many hobbies; gym classes, book clubs, sports clubs, social clubs. Not only do the clients need these to balance out their lives, but those who run them need the financial reward in order to feed their families. So yes, let’s reduce close contact with others, but in a world where everything’s at a click of a button, let’s make sure we continue to stay in touch with ingenious ways. Summer is coming; move clubs outdoors if possible; use online videos, conference calls, and social media to keep this side of life going.

It’s the start of a new normal, which will take some adjusting to, but hopefully by everyone being sensible (you’ve bought all your toilet roll now, haven’t you?!) and by keeping an eye out for others (we don’t know many at risk people locally, but I’ve offered to organise online shopping for my Granny, and plan to send her bits and pieces in the post over the next few months as well as regular emails to stop her feeling so isolated), we will survive.