Lunging With Two Reins

I’ve fallen back in love with lunging with two reins for a number of reasons, but in all the cases I’ve used it with there has been a huge improvement.

My first victim, I mean client, was a mare who has always struggled with straightness due to previous injuries, but is becoming much better under saddle. However I don’t find her lunging sessions as beneficial to her because she drifts out, bananas her body, gets a bit stuck on the track and is a touch lazy. I felt that she needed an outside rein contact to reduce how much she could twist and pull me out on the lunge. I also hoped that the outside lunge line going around her hindquarters would be a prompt for her to go forwards.

She was not impressed. When I flicked the outside rein over her rump and she felt it come into contact with her haunches she stopped, tail facing me, swishing it angrily. I let her tell me how upset she was before asking her to walk on, and initially I had my work cut out to keep her walking and on my circle, not drifting to the fence line. After arguing with me for a circuit she started to relax, and I felt she was straighter through her body and not holding her hindquarters in so I asked her to trot. Again, she grumbled for a few minutes until she aligned herself and began to move with more impulsion and efficiency. Combined with her circles becoming rounder and her inside hind leg becoming more engaged, the trot improved in cadence and she started to use her abdominal muscles and topline.

The next time her owner rode, she felt a huge difference in her mare’s vertical balance; she had a uniform bend throughout her body and had an engaged inside hind leg. The mare was also less fixated on staying on the track, which triggered my next lesson of working on the inner track, and my rider had more of a response from her outside aids.

I suggested double lunging to another client with her young horse who long reins well, but tries to turn in on the lunge. The outside rein will prevent him turning in to his handler, which means he can be taught how to lunge and then just lunged with one rein as required. This will allow his owner to introduce canter work safely on the lunge.

Double-line lunging a little pony in rehab has really helped her learn to seek the contact forwards and stretch over her back and subsequently develop her topline.

Then last week I decided to lunge a horse who I often school, to change things up a bit. He’s a long horse, who finds it hard to connect his back end to his front end and wiggles to avoid doing so. I’ve done a lot of work improving his rider’s outside aids to help stabilise the wiggles, and I felt lunging with two reins would complement this work.

This horse was the only one I felt was ready to canter in the double lines, and where I felt would benefit the most. You can see in the video how balanced this horse is with the outside lunge line supporting him.

Lunging with two reins helps bring the outside shoulder around on the circle, so improves the horse’s straightness, understanding of the outside aids, engagement and connection. This results in an improvement to the horse’s vertical balance and way of going as they use their body correctly.

So how do you lunge with two reins? Fit a bridle and roller to the horse, and run the lunge lines from the bit through the rings on the roller. The outside lunge line then runs round the horse’s hindquarters and into your hand which is nearest the tail as you stand in the usual lunging stance. The inside rein is held in your hand closest to the horse’s head. The horse is sent forwards with the voice, a flick of the lunge whip, or the outside lunge line against the hindquarters. Once you’ve got used to handling the two reins (experience with long lining is helpful!) Lunging with double reins is not that difficult, and has remarkable benefits to the horses when ridden. Definitely worth trying as a change to your usual lunging technique.

A First Jumping Lesson

I gave a pair their first jumping lesson this week. The rider has jumped before, but is bringing on her ex-broodmare slowly. We loose jumped her a couple of months ago to see if she actually knew what to do, but otherwise have focused on her flatwork to build her muscle and strength. Canter is coming along slowly with the help of poles to help her find the rhythm.Anyway, they had a go jumping over the weekend and felt it was a bit chaotic, so I decided to give them a better experience of leaving the ground.After focusing on transitions within the gaits whilst warming up, and getting the mare bending and thinking about her rider’s aids. I laid out three canter poles between K and E on the track. I used the track to maximise the arena so that the mare was most able to stay in balance on the turns. Her right canter is her weakest so I positioned the poles just off the corner to help them keep the canter rhythm until the poles. They could have a longer straight approach on the left canter because the mare can keep left canter together in straight lines.As is with horses, I rapidly had to move onto Plan B, when the mare decided that right canter was out of the question today. She often strikes off incorrectly, but can be helped out by a trot 10m circle before the canter transition. Not today though! There was no point banging our heads against a brick wall, getting frustrated. We’d jump out of left canter and try right another day. If she continues to struggle with it we’ll investigate further.So after trotting over the poles on the right rein, and then once on the left rein, I had them canter over the poles. The mare’s canter is currently very flat and verges on the point of four beat, so I kept the poles wide to improve her rhythm, and once her canter rhythm is established we can begin to balance it so that her haunches are under her body and she’s working her body correctly.Now it was time to leave the ground. I rolled the two poles closest to K together to make a teeny tiny cross pole. Then I rolled the third pole out so that it was a whole canter stride away from the fence. I wanted them to canter over the pole, have a whole canter stride and then pop the jump. This setup wouldn’t phase an inexperienced horse, but would put her in the right take off spot.They did it once, and met the first pole badly. With the mare only having one canter gear we have to adjust the distance of the approach so that she can fit several whole canter strides in. Which will help her jump confidently and neatly. A horse who has several gears to the canter can be adjusted to accommodate a set distance. I got my rider to ride deeper into the corner, which meant that they met the pole well the second time. I built the jump up to a bigger cross once we knew the striding and their line was right, and they flew over a couple of times, growing in confidence each time.To finish, I converted the cross pole into an upright. The biggest they’d jumped to date, but as the mare was already jumping that big over the cross pole, it was a mind over matter element for her rider. To know that they could jump it.And they did!

The plan now is to keep working on right canter, and do more canter polework to help establish the rhythm, and then using poles to help set up the mare for jumping, and to tell her where to take off until she is more experienced and has more understanding of the idea of flying.

“Maybe it’s Maybelline”

My friend’s horse has always had a mane to be proud of. It’s very long, full of volume and in great condition. Her owner is very proud of it.

Was very proud of it.

Above, is one of Rose Lewis’s fantastic black background shots of this pony and her mane, which hangs below her elbows. I’ll wait while you go and check where the elbow is on a horse.

If you already know this, then while we’re waiting, have a look at Rose’s website – www.daydreamequineart.co.uk/ – there are lots of famous faces in her portfolio, as well as yours truly. But I don’t think I qualify for the famous faces category.

Anyway, back to the purpose of my post.

This pony’s behaviour has changed recently and I became obvious that she was uncomfortable in her back. My friend started investigating the saddle and booked her in with the physio.

The physio found quite a lot of tender spots, so gave her a good massage and prescribed rest and light, unridden exercise. Last week was her second appointment, and the physio made a horrifying suggestion.

“Why don’t you pull her mane?”

Once my friend had picked herself up off the floor, the physio explained further. The little mare has a lot of tension in her epaxial muscles (the muscles that stabilise the neck), particularly on the right. The physio thought that whilst the quantity and weight of mane didn’t necessarily cause the hypertonicity, it will hinder her recovery.

If you think about when you have your hair cut significantly, like when I had eight inches off in the summer, you can feel the weight difference. If you also have thick hair and get it layered or thinned, then you feel inches taller without the weight of your hair. Likewise, if you have your long hair tied up in a high ponytail (think Ariana Grande) you invariably get a headache after a period of time.

After some counciling, my friend set to work. She started by thinning it before taking out the length, leaving a huge pile of hair on the ground. The mare looks like a completely different pony! The below photo is after the first session, it will be neatened over this week, but you can see the he difference!

Hopefully the physio finds less hypertonicity in the neck and front of shoulder muscles on her next visit. I found it fascinating, because a long, thick mane causing muscular problems, had never occurred to me. In the wild manes wouldn’t grow as long and thick as you often see because they’d be pulled out on brambles or rubbed off on gravelly ground when they roll.

I’d be really interested to know if anyone else has come across physiological problems associated with voluminous manes, or even with shorter manes that are regularly plaited for competitions. I’m not going to tell all my clients with long manes to chop them off, but I will definitely be more open to reducing it if we find soreness or asymmetry in their neck.

Buying a New Saddle

After selling Otis’s dressage saddle in the spring as it wasn’t quite right for Phoenix, I decided it was time to get a replacement. I decided not to get one immediately because of our other issues, but now that Phoenix is in such a good place, working well, and her shape has changed, it’s time to find us a new saddle!

What should you expect from a saddle fit? Or rather, how do you know that you’re getting a good service? After all, it’s so important to get the right saddle for both horse and rider.

Firstly, find a master saddler. You can access a list of qualified saddlers who are registered with the Society of Master Saddlers on their website. Do some research too, as some saddlers only sell stock certain brands of saddle, some don’t sell second hand, and some have more experience with certain types of horse or saddles. You want to find a saddler who can meet your requirements.

Speak to the saddler to book an appointment; tell them what you’re looking for (jump, GP, endurance saddle; new or second hand), describe your physique and that of your horse, as well as both of your current abilities and fitness. Some saddlers like to see a photo of the horse to help them assess what sort of saddle would fit.

Once you’ve booked your appointment you need to work out how best to prepare your horse. They need to be clean and dry, but bear in mind the saddler needs to see them working sensibly, so it might be worth lunging a horse who might be fresh. When Phoenix had her saddles checked in the spring, when she was being very tense in the arena, I took her for an hours hack before her saddle fit to thoroughly warm her up and relax her so the saddler could see her working properly, rather than seeing the first fifteen minutes of silliness. This time, I schooled her before, and he actually ended up observing it while I rode upon arrival, before he took a closer look at the fit.

So with a clean horse, either standing in their stable or on the yard if it’s dry, the saddler will have a look at their back, checking for any lumps, muscle soreness, muscle symmetry, and anything else which may affect the horse’s acceptance of the saddle.

Then the saddler should try the selection of saddles that they’ve brought with them on your horse. Some can be discarded straight away, others need a closer look, and sometimes they just fit snugly. They fit the saddle without any pads, stirrups or accessories, checking that the seat sits horizontally, the pommel is a hands width from the wither, the saddle doesn’t pass the last rib, and that the shoulders aren’t inhibited when the girth is done up.

Once happy, the stirrups and saddle cloth are put on and then the saddler wants to see the horse ridden. This is to check that the saddle doesn’t sink too low once the rider sits on, and that the saddle fits the rider, as well as the horse moving comfortably with the saddle. Ideally, you need to show walk, trot, canter, and jump if necessary. However, if for whatever reason you can’t or don’t want to then be honest with the saddler. My friend has just had a saddle fitted to her new horse, but she was worried about cantering him before he’d settled in and she’d gotten to know him, so she explained to the saddler, who was happy to assess the saddle in trot and then potentially return in a few weeks time to assess the saddle fit in canter, and make adjustments to accommodate her horse’s sure to be changing shape. If you are rehabbing your horse then you need to take this into account too as they’re likely to change shape rapidly, but may also not be up to cantering for the saddler.

The saddler shouldn’t rush you, after all you need to be confident in your decision as it’s not a cheap outgoing! When Mum bought a new saddle for Matt last year her saddler was very patient, letting her ride for over twenty minutes to see if she really did like the saddle.

An ideal saddle fits on top of a thin numnah, but sometimes saddlers recommend other pads. Perhaps a non-slip pad to help stabilise the saddle on a rotund horse, or a sheepskin numnah which can even out pressure and is said to be cooler than cotton, or a prolite pad to overcome any asymmetries or muscle atrophy until the horse muscles up.

The saddler’s job is to find a saddle which fits both horse and rider, and then help you perfect the fit, temporarily or permanently. This may be by using a different girth to best6 fit the horse’s girth groove, using a pad underneath, and using a different configuration of girth straps.

By the end of all that you should have a saddle which fits both you and your horse, which you are 100 percent happy with, and the saddler can review the saddle on another visit to ensure it is moulding nicely to your horse’s shape and doesn’t need adjusting.

Flu Boosters

In August it was six months since Phoenix’s last flu vaccination. Despite there still being an abnormally high number of equine flu cases in the UK in 2019 it’s dropped from most people’s radar. Every so often I hear of a case nearby, but it soon blows over.

Back in February the equestrian population was advised to ensure their horse had been vaccinated within the last six months as that was when vets had started using a vaccine effective against this strain of flu.

A lot of competition venues, yards, training centres started enforcing that all horses had to have been vaccinated within six or twelve months. There was a discrepancy between requirements which meant lots of double checking before entering a competition. And it has helped reduce the spread of equine flu.

Some places have relaxed their rules from six monthly vaccinations to annual. British Dressage require competing horses to have had their most recent booster within twelve months, whilst British Eventing requires it to be within six months. British Riding Clubs have tightened their already stringent vaccination checks, which has competitors quaking in their boots at area qualifiers.

Phoenix was due her annual vaccination in February, so she was done then and I pushed all thought of boosters from my mind as we weren’t doing much. In August I squeezed in a cross country schooling session as a centre two days before her six months were up. Then I was in a quandary, unsure what to do. I didn’t need to vaccinate her at six months; my vets weren’t recommending to given that she’d had a booster since the initial outbreak. They felt that annual vaccinations provided enough cover. If we weren’t going out anywhere other than local hacking then I’d feel that annual vaccinations will suffice. I definitely feel that horses like Otis, retired or in light, non-competitive work are fine with yearly boosters.

When I planned my autumn play dates, I had a couple of events which did require her to have been vaccinated within six months of attending. So I had her done. I also decided that by taking her out to a variety of competitions in different areas there was a risk of her picking up the virus, so it was best to give her a booster.

I did however, have an interesting discussion with the vet who came out about these rules. We both agreed that whilst ensuring the majority of horses, with the consciousness owners, were vaccinated annually, there were major flaws which needed addressing in order to control the spread of equine influenza.

Firstly, the fact that although most competitions are insisting on vaccinations being up to date, very few check this upon arrival. So you could take an unvaccinated horse to a significant number of events and get away with it. Yes, it’s another thing to organise, but checking passports as people drive into the car park is the most effective. Then of course is the fact that some people sneakily take the wrong passport. So the passport meets requirements, but it doesn’t belong to the horse inside the lorry. This has led to some competitions doing spot checks, and going inside vehicles to check that the horse matches their ID.

I was talking to someone today, who transports horses for a living and she was telling me how she jet washes her lorry between outings and mists disinfectant in to minimise the risk of spreading disease – be it equine flu, strangles or equine herpes. Do all transporters do that? Well no, not when you consider that some will plan a route up the country and pick up and drop off several horses en route. This is perhaps a factor to consider if you hire transport.

Thirdly, there is a major hole at the UK ports. Only last month a local horse dealer went over to the Irish sales and picked up a lorry load of youngsters. They brought them into the UK via a ferry, stressed them with a long, hot journey, without a single vaccination amongst the horses. Then proceeded to advertise the horses and book viewings from the day they arrived. Regardless of the lack of vaccinations, the poor horses are susceptible to any illness because they were tired, dehydrated and stressed. So they could develop equine flu upon arrival, or in the first few days of being in the UK. They might be carrying the virus, cough over a potential buyer, who then goes to another yard to view another horse, taking the virus with them. Thus the disease spreads.

Horses coming into the UK, from Ireland or the continent, need to be innoculated against equine flu and have some form of an isolation procedure. It’s not the private individuals the BEF and AHT need to target with vaccination rules, it’s the professionals who are transporting horses on a daily basis, and those importing horses. Look at the Icelandics. They don’t let any pony who has left the island to return, regardless of vaccinations, as they may bring disease back. Recently, they culled a load of sheep who became infected from an imported ram. Perhaps this is a bit extreme, but we need to tighten control of our borders. Sorry, that sounded a little bit Brexit.

Research is suggesting that there will be a move towards six monthly vaccinations, but I hope that legislation retains some common sense and doesn’t require equines who don’t travel much to have two boosters a year, whilst competition horses or those who travel a lot would benefit from increased protection and would help reduce the risk of the virus spreading.

Visual Learners

Teaching these days is all about providing information in a variety of forms. Years ago teachers would teach verbally, but nowadays they offer pictures and videos, physical activities and social activities to support their verbal lectures.

In an arena I predominantly use verbal explanations, but I also use videos and photos to feedback to clients, and have been known to get a nearby rider to demonstrate an exercise (especially rising canter). I will also walk any lines to help demonstrate an exercise. Sometimes physical feedback, such as adjusting a foot’s position in the stirrup, is as useful teaching tool.

I’ve been teaching a young boy, who has high functioning autism, and he’s really testing my imagination in terms of effectively getting my message across to him in a format he understands. I know not everyone likes to label children, but from a teaching perspective it’s very useful to know of any problems, if that’s the right term, so I can better understand their reactions or behaviour, and adjust my approach so that they get the best out of the lesson.

He’s very literal, so I have to be careful not to use figurative language. Today I said, “tell Tilly to go round the edge” as his pony started to cut the corner. So he said, “Tilly, go round the edge.” Of course I meant to tell the pony with his legs and hands, not to literally tell her! So I’m having to adapt my words and phrases so that there’s no room for misinterpretation.

I also have to explain exercises very explicitly so that he understands them. For example, I tell him at which letter we will go into trot, and then I have to list each letter he will ride past, and at which letter he needs to ride a downward transition. Otherwise he trots from the start letter across the school to the final letter!

To help me direct him, I use a variety of cones and poles. For example, he must ride past the yellow cone before he turns, or he should halt between the poles. These props are easy to adjust to make an exercise easier or harder, and seem to really help him focus on where he’s going. He also has immediate feedback as to whether he’s achieved the aim because he’s either the right side of the prop, or he’s not.

This is a useful approach for visual learners, so definitely one for me to bear in mind when teaching others. I have one client (who knows who she is) who always cuts the corner after poles, so when we progress to jumping she is going to have cones to go round so that I can break this bad habit!

With this young boy, I’ve also had to get creative to help improve his riding position. Sticking to visual cues, I put red electric tape onto his reins which he must hold in order to have the correct length of rein and to have the reins the same length. He tends to, like all beginners, to hold his hands close to his tummy. So I sprayed purple spray onto his pony’s withers to show him where his hands should be. Of course this works best on the greys and palominos.

When we’ve been practising jumping position, to improve his balance and lower leg stability, I’ve been putting a plait in his pony’s mane for him to hold so that he is moving his hands the correct distance up her neck.

He has some special gloves on order, which have an L and R on to help him learn his left and rights. I know many adults who would also like these gloves!

I’m sure as he progresses through his riding I will need to become even more imaginative – suggestions on postcards! I think I will mark a line along each shoulder in a different colour to help him learn his trot diagonals and to see the shoulder moving. It’s all about finding ways to help him understand different concepts which makes sense to him.

But I’m up for a challenge!

An Unlucky Pole

I took Phoenix showjumping today. She stormed round the 70cm clear, pushed into third place by some whizzy kids. In her first 80cm class, she had a pole down. But was still the fastest four faulter to be placed seventh.

On a side note, before I return to my main reel of thought, I’d like to well, boast really, about how amazing she is to take out. Loads herself, waits patiently and quietly for her class, warms up calmly, waits quietly, jumps her best, and then stands round while her little fan hugs and kisses her neck. She really makes the day enjoyable from that perspective.

Back to my original topic of conversation. That pole we had down. It reminded me of a conversation recently held between friends. One friend was suggesting that there is no such thing as an unlucky pole, and it is becoming an excuse for sloppy riding and a lack of clear rounds.

After every jumping round I do, I come away planning my improvements. Even the clear rounds. Last time we competed and had the last jump of last round – yes, annoying because we were a good ten seconds faster than our rivals – I knew exactly what had gone wrong. In trying not to upset Phoenix’s fairly fragile canter I hadn’t half halted between the last two fences and she needed it. So she had bounded on in a flat canter and basically went through the jump. I beat myself up then for letting her down more than anything, and went away to strengthen the canter and ride related distances properly. That wasn’t an unlucky pole.

Today; what went wrong? I’m yet to see the video, but it was a related distance on a slight left curve. We had the second element down. Phoenix’s canter felt much stronger throughout the day and she wasn’t towing me onto her forehand. She’d jumped big into the related distance because it was a loud filler and I’d really pressed the go button, and I think that this meant the distance between the fences along with the line I rode, and the stage she’s at in her training meant that she just got too close to the second element and brought down the front rail of the oxer.

Now was that unlucky? I think it could have gone either way today. We could have gotten away with it. Neither of us did anything wrong, she wasn’t tired, her technique was neat, and it’s perfectly within her capabilities, but the sequence of events just didn’t flow on the day. It was unlucky in the sense that she was jumping very well and confidently so didn’t really deserve to knock one with such a slight error.

That doesn’t mean there isn’t anything for me to learn from today. Her canter still needs improvement as if I had more scope to collect her I could have adjusted her enough to correct her bold jump into the related distance. I could’ve ridden a wider line, but it’s hard to change course once you’re on it. I also think I over-rode the first element, but I think the more competitive experience we both get together the better as I’ll know exactly how much leg to use and she’ll be less likely to have a second look at a fence. I also think she’ll benefit from a few jumping exercises I’ve got planned to help teach her not to bowl on quite so much through a related distance, as that is a common theme. But we’ll do our homework for next time.

So is there such a thing as an unlucky pole? I think you can be unlucky as a pair in that you deserved to go clear from the way you rode the rest of the round and the minor error which caused the pole to come down. You’ve tried your best with your ability on that day. But that doesn’t mean it’s an excuse. After all, a clear round is the goal and a pole down is a less than perfect result, so improvements can be made at home.

We riders need to walk away from a knock down and try to work out how we can improve on it. Be it riding better lines, improving the canter, practising on different surfaces and inclines, practising with fillers or water trays, changing tack, boots or studs if they’re becoming a hindrance or any other weakness you feel you and your horse have. Then, we will achieve perfection.

The video from the 80cm class has just come through, so I thought I’d share it so you can see our slight error. It was a straightforward course, but full of related distances, which is the area we have we working on most recently so it was a useful test.

Working a Young Horse

There’s such extreme opinions and attitudes towards working young horses; when they should be backed, first jumped etc. Racehorses are still on the track as two year olds, and some people leave a horse feral until they’re five.

Despite scientific evidence about when a horse’s skeleton is matured, there is still a lot of pressure for talented, well bred sports horses to be produced for four year old classes. Which causes all sorts of problems later in life for them. It’s a society of instantaneous gratification; in which horses who are capable of performing today do, rather than waiting until they are mature enough to in five years time.

In this sense, lesser quality horses – perhaps with less talent or with a less favourable conformation – actually fare better because they are produced at a slower rate and usually later in their lives.

Anyway, I’ve come to my own conclusion about how I feel an intelligent, talented young horse with a trainable temperament and good work ethic should be nurtured. It’s important to introduce brain work early in their lives, without doing too much physical work.

Mental stimulation can involve introducing a young horse to different environments, showing them poles, fillers, tarpaulins etc, in hand work to establish good manners, taking them to in hand shows, leading them out along quiet lanes, and meeting cars and bicycles. This sort of enrichment builds a bond with their handler, which should make the backing process less stressful for the horse, and builds the horse’s confidence when out and about.

I’ve got a new client, with her new four year old. The mare was produced in Ireland before being sold at a sales, and has a very clever mind as well as talent to boot. Whilst she needs to mature and increase condition, she also needs work to keep her busy brain occupied so that she stops jumping out her field or box walking.

They had their first lesson this week. The mare is fussy to mount, quite anxious and tense. This behaviour stems from anxiety so we have formulated a plan to overcome this. As it’s not rudeness, I don’t think the mare will benefit from a confrontational approach, but we do need to encourage her to stand more quietly to mount. It’s a long term approach, of mounting and allowing the horse to walk until she relaxes slightly and then asking her to halt momentarily. Hopefully each time she’s mounted the walk period gets shorter and halt gets longer. Time can also be spent standing by the mounting block with nothing further happening. We don’t want to add to the tension, but we need to introduce the concept of better mounting manners. Hopefully within two months she is less anxious about the mounting procedure and only needs walk a couple of steps before halting for as long as her rider needs her to. Racehorses have a similar problem with mounting because they’re used to being legged up and hurried into work.

The mare, as with all youngsters, walked into the arena and immediately started calling and looking for her friends, drifting back towards the gate. She’d left her brain in the stable. Add this to her tense, quick walk, and there’s nothing to work with. So we began the lesson by my rider just walking around the arena, circling around every jump she passed. I told her not to worry about the quality of the walk, or the bend. We just wanted to use the circles to draw the mare’s focus to her rider, forgetting about her friends in the stable. My rider could start to think about her aids and assess the mare’s understanding and response, but we didn’t want to start changing the mare until her brain was on side and she had begun to relax. It took a good few minutes of walking for the mare to take her mind off the gate and stables, and to relax into a longer striding walk. You could see she was starting to concentrate on what was going on in the arena.

Now that the mare was starting to relax we could introduce halt transitions. Reluctant to stop, she opens her mouth and tries to barge through the hand. She’s in a Micklem bridle, with a Neue schule eggbutt snaffle with bit stabilisers, which means she isn’t fussing as much with her tongue or gaping her mouth as wide as she did when viewed, so I’m hoping this habit reduces more when she settles fully into her new home. Anyway, I asked my rider to vibrate the rein as the mare set against her hand so that we diffused the tug of war situation. After a couple of halts, the vibrations were less because the mare was starting to understand the question and responded to my riders’ initial aids.

With this starting to fall into place, and the mare focused on her work, we could then take a five minute break. They halted and stood still for almost five minutes, taking in the scenery, and most importantly, relaxing. This halt is the type I’d like them to get upon mounting, so it’s good to see the concept is there. We repeated the halt frequently throughout the rest of the lesson to give the mare time to assimilate each exercise.

Staying in walk, as I now wanted to ask the mare a couple of questions to see how trainable she is, we began to introduce the idea of straightness. Now I know it’s halfway up the Scales of Training, but the mare was showing preference for left bend and unless we iron out her banana-ness, we won’t be able to start at the bottom of the Scale.

On the right rein, the one which the mare bent outwards, we started riding a square. Again, we weren’t making a huge change to the mare’s way of going, but rather showing her that there was a different way of moving. Riding straight lines emcourages the mare to straighten out of her left bend, and start to think about bending to the right. Her rider could also check she was sitting straight and giving even aids.

As with all youngsters, the mare wobbled along the sides of our square, so we made sure the reins and hands were channeling the mare straight without being claustrophobic, and the legs hung round her barrel to guide her between the reins. Just with a little more support from her rider and the mare started to move straighter, stride out and relax.

We repeated the square on the left rein to show the mare that she didn’t have to curl up to the left. Then we did some more circles around jumps and my rider felt the mare was better balanced and she had more influence over their direction. I was pleased with the improvement in the mare’s walk. As she relaxed she was exhaling in big snorts, lengthening her stride, lowering her neck and generally looking happier.

We finished by trotting a gentle square on both reins, aiming for a consistent rhythm and the mare relaxing into trot, stretching herself into a longer frame as she and her rider found their balance together.

Despite spending most of the lesson in walk the mare was mentally drained. She stood with her head low, ears floppy. You could see that she was tired. Her working routine will be two schooling sessions a week; one a lesson similar to this one and the other a shorter revision session with her owner. The rest of the week will be spent either in hand walks, some in hand work, such as pole mazes, or short ridden hacks. She’s a very clever horse so we need to keep her brain ticking over in order for her to be more manageable in the field and stable, but we do need to be careful not to stress her body physically, but I think this arrangement should benefit her best.

Lightening the Forehand

Feedback I’ve had when jumping Phoenix, and what I know to be true, is that I need to get her stronger in canter and get her nose off her chest. This isn’t because I put her in an overbent frame, but more to do with the fact her confirmation allows her to do this easily and when she’s finding the canter work harder she leans on my hands and gets a bit on the forehand.

On the flat we’ve been focusing on relaxation and self carriage, ignoring the canter unless she’s in the right frame of mind because she can get uptight and a bit panicky if you do too much correcting to her way of going. She doesn’t like to be interfered with.

I’ve kept the idea of her taking her nose out in any canter work we’ve done on hacks and any other time, but I decided this week to give her more of a challenge.

I laid out three canter poles, then one canter stride to a final pole. Phoenix is getting much more confident in her footwork through pole exercises so I wanted the three poles to help establish her rhythm and discourage her from rushing. As she can sometimes drift through grids I laid two poles as an arrow with the tip touching the final pole. I wanted to jump an A-frame but wanted to introduce the question early so that Phoenix could process it and be confident.

After trotting and cantering the poles from each rein I put the final fence up, leaning the diagonal poles in the middle. I approached in canter, and whilst Phoenix was spot on over the jump, really lifting her shoulders and staying straight, she kept giving a hop, skip and a jump over the canter poles.

I felt like she was getting herself in a bit of a stew on the approach because she was a bit too fast and unbalanced in canter. So I trotted into the exercise, letting her pick up canter over the first pole. Then, she was foot perfect and wasn’t as quick. Which felt better as it felt more controlled, like she understood the exercise more.

I continued to approach in trot, and gradually raised the second and third canter poles to little bounces. Now I actually wanted her to give a little skip over the poles, so that she lifted her shoulders, engaged her hindquarters and lifted her nose so that she was looking where she was going.

The final jump immediately felt better, as she pinged over them, really coming up in front.

I raised the A-frame fence gradually, but Phoenix took each height in her stride, feeling very correct in her bascule and technique. I loved the feel of the canter now – the balance and power that I had – and it was only when the jump reached 1.05m did she feel like she was having to work over it. I only did it once before leaving our session on a very positive note. She had jumped her biggest to date comfortably, and was confident in her approach. I felt there was an improvement to the canter, which she will hopefully take forward to the flatwork and allow me to adjust her to re-create that canter next time I ride.

My plans now are to do more of the bounce work, perhaps a line of six or so, to strengthen Phoenix’s hindquarters and improve her canter, as she seems to respond better to the poles dictating her canter rather than me interfering. She’s already schooling over 90cm courses, so I won’t push it any higher without getting her some more competition experience and getting her stronger. But hopefully the combination of the bounce work and more canter work on the flat will improve her performance around courses.

Cones and Circles

Mum asked for my expertise over the weekend as she’d been struggling with an exercise she’d been given last week.

I quite like the exercise though, so thought I’d share it with you.

Place three cones along the centre line, one at X and the other two ten metres either side.

From the right rein, turn down the centre line in trot and ride a ten metre circle around the first cone. You want to aim to stay equidistant from the cone the whole way round the circle. Continue round the circle until you’ve ridden a complete circle and the next time you cross the centre line change the rein and circle around the second cone in the opposite direction. One and a half circles later, move on to riding a circle in the original direction around the third cone. It’s a really good suppling sequence to ride.

Initially, you’re aiming for the three circles to be similar in size, and for it to flow between circles. Hopefully you’ll notice if one rein is harder than the other and you can spend some time improving the circles on that rein before coming back to the exercise.

You’ll remember a few weeks ago I blogged about how to ride a change of bend? If you feel that the circle sequence is going wrong at the change of rein, break down the change of bend and ensure you are switching from position left to position right (or vice versa) to allow your horse to change their bend and are supporting them as they do.

Now that the circles are hopefully feeling similar in shape and fairly round, we can step it up a notch. Try counting the number of strides you get on each half circle in the exercise. You want to get the same number. This means that your circles are round and not egg-shaped, and that your right and left circles are the same size. You’ll also discover if the change of rein between the circles affects the size and shape of your circles.

It sounds like a simple exercise, but the fact you’re working away from the fence means you as a rider, need to support your horse more as they will more often than not drift towards the fence. Which should mean that you notice any weakness in your aids. It also serves to improve your horse’s symmetry and suppleness hugely.