I Blame the Mud

Personally, I lay all blame squarely on the mud for this subject, but I have to say that I’m so proud of my clients, and pleased to have such a good bunch who listen closely to what their horse is saying and so averts a potentially expensive and time consuming treatment and rehabilitation programme.

On an aside, I’ve have several clients who have been on long term rehabilitation programmes for their horse’s injury, which in some cases their horse came to them with, and they are coming through the other side. One lady proudly told me that the physio feels that her horse no longer needs treatment to mend her long term problems, but now needs treatment to maintain her excellent muscle tone. Just like a normal horse! Another lady was told that her horse is moving well, and has better muscle tone than previously so it’s time to crack on and work him that little bit harder so that he starts to develop this muscle. I’m so pleased when I hear this positive feedback from physios. My riders are doing the right thing!

Back to my initial subject of listening to your horse. In their first lesson back after Christmas, one of my riders had a problem jumping. Her pony jumped beautifully over some smaller jumps, especially as we were working on jumping a tarpaulin. He did give a couple of bucks on landing when he basculed particularly nicely, but this isn’t uncommon for him. However, he jumped very erratically over some 90cm fences, even stopping. This is well within his comfort zone so I felt it was odd. We discussed the oddness, but he felt fine to his rider so we decided to monitor it.

The following week, I built a simple grid. If he’d lost his confidence, although I couldn’t work out why, this would help. They flew the grid at 80cm, although he wasn’t happy turning left after the grid and was marginally better with a right canter lead approach. Again, this isn’t unusual with his way of going. But as soon as I put the jump up a notch he threw in the towel. We reverted to the lower grid and just popped him through to finish on a positive note. As I couldn’t see any lameness or sign of soreness, my only suggestion was that he saw a physio or chiropractor in case he’d tweaked something and flatwork and low jumping didn’t affect it, but the extra effort of a bigger jump caused a twinge.

Anyway, she booked the Mctimoney chiropractor and just lightly rode him in the interim. I had feedback from the treatment yesterday – a slightly tilted pelvis, but more interestingly, a pulled muscle between his ribs and pelvis. Possibly due to careering around a slippery field. Which would explain everything. Thankfully, this pony doesn’t need any more treatment, just an easy week building him back up. But his refusing and erratic jumps could so easily be misinterpreted as naughty behaviour and disciplined, or ignored for a few weeks. Whereas by paying close attention to what he was telling her, my rider averted any major incident, either by his behaviour escalating so that it was dangerous, or by his injury worsening or a subsequent injury occuring from him trying to protect the pulled muscle.

Another rider had something similar just after Christmas when I noticed her horse’s right hind being slightly short in stride length, and not picking it up as much as usual. I was riding him and wasn’t happy with the trot, although I hadn’t noticed it in his walk around the tracks to warm up. He wasn’t lame to the bystander, but it wasn’t normal for this horse. I text my client to tell her and she immediately contacted her chiropractor, who came out a couple of days later and found a very sore fetlock and tight muscles all over – again, she put it down to field antics, but this time suggested that it happened because the mud is so claggy, he literally left a leg behind whilst showing off and wrenched it. But because his owner acted swiftly he only needed one treatment, and was completely recovered within a week.

So you can see why I’m blaming the mud! My final casualty to it felt off in walk when I hacked him. Not lame, although he definitely wasn’t comfortable in trot, but wobbly and uncoordinated. I reduced his work to walk only on as flat a ground as I could provide until we waited for his chiropractic appointment. By walking him out in a long and low frame he started to feel much better, more together and stronger. I did find that he was leaning on the right leg though, so much so that his winter coat was rubbing off with friction. Initially I thought it was something I was doing (moving my leg excessively etc) but after paying close attention to the matter, I felt that he was pushing right as he walked, so pushing into my right leg. His treatment showed very tight, sore muscles over his hindquarters and lumbar area, which ties in with slipping in the field. Hopefully he won’t do anymore field acrobatics, and I can start to build him up again, although I’ll be limited with the lack of dry bridleways!

I actually feel very grateful to have clients who pay so much attention to changes in their horse’s behaviour and try to find out why before labelling the behaviour as naughty. I’m equally grateful that they respect my opinion, based on observations and feelings from the saddle. Of course, I’m not an expert in this area but I like to think that I know these horses well enough, and have a good relationship with their owners, that when they aren’t themselves yet look normal from a distance, we can have a conversation about the different possible causes (be it back, saddle, bridle, teeth, feet) and can investigate them. Then between us we can nip any issues in the bud, get them treated before secondary problems develop, and with the minimal disruption to their activity plan.

“Maybe it’s Maybelline”

My friend’s horse has always had a mane to be proud of. It’s very long, full of volume and in great condition. Her owner is very proud of it.

Was very proud of it.

Above, is one of Rose Lewis’s fantastic black background shots of this pony and her mane, which hangs below her elbows. I’ll wait while you go and check where the elbow is on a horse.

If you already know this, then while we’re waiting, have a look at Rose’s website – www.daydreamequineart.co.uk/ – there are lots of famous faces in her portfolio, as well as yours truly. But I don’t think I qualify for the famous faces category.

Anyway, back to the purpose of my post.

This pony’s behaviour has changed recently and I became obvious that she was uncomfortable in her back. My friend started investigating the saddle and booked her in with the physio.

The physio found quite a lot of tender spots, so gave her a good massage and prescribed rest and light, unridden exercise. Last week was her second appointment, and the physio made a horrifying suggestion.

“Why don’t you pull her mane?”

Once my friend had picked herself up off the floor, the physio explained further. The little mare has a lot of tension in her epaxial muscles (the muscles that stabilise the neck), particularly on the right. The physio thought that whilst the quantity and weight of mane didn’t necessarily cause the hypertonicity, it will hinder her recovery.

If you think about when you have your hair cut significantly, like when I had eight inches off in the summer, you can feel the weight difference. If you also have thick hair and get it layered or thinned, then you feel inches taller without the weight of your hair. Likewise, if you have your long hair tied up in a high ponytail (think Ariana Grande) you invariably get a headache after a period of time.

After some counciling, my friend set to work. She started by thinning it before taking out the length, leaving a huge pile of hair on the ground. The mare looks like a completely different pony! The below photo is after the first session, it will be neatened over this week, but you can see the he difference!

Hopefully the physio finds less hypertonicity in the neck and front of shoulder muscles on her next visit. I found it fascinating, because a long, thick mane causing muscular problems, had never occurred to me. In the wild manes wouldn’t grow as long and thick as you often see because they’d be pulled out on brambles or rubbed off on gravelly ground when they roll.

I’d be really interested to know if anyone else has come across physiological problems associated with voluminous manes, or even with shorter manes that are regularly plaited for competitions. I’m not going to tell all my clients with long manes to chop them off, but I will definitely be more open to reducing it if we find soreness or asymmetry in their neck.

Body Posture

I’ve become more aware recently of horse’s posture and what clues this gives to how they’re feeling and their way of going.

Stand back and take a good, critical look at your horse as they stand quietly on the yard. Do they stand square? Do they look like their weight is evenly distributed?

A horse with a good posture will stand fairly square, weight balanced evenly on all four feet, and look comfortable. It sounds silly, but it should look like they’re holding this stance easily. Their head and neck shouldn’t be held too high or tense, and you shouldn’t see tension along the back. It depends on conformation, but the back wants to be basically horizontal. The top of the horse, from their poll to their dock, wants to look longer than from their neck to their tail. Below is a photo of Phoenix showing a good posture: she’s standing evenly, albeit not square, and whilst she needs to work on relaxing her brachiocephalic muscle, you can see she has a good length of topline.

So what posture problems are there?

An inverted posture, a term I learnt recently, is when the back and top line muscles are tight and tensed. This causes the neck to draw back and up, the back to hollow. It’s a bit like looking at a “u” shape. This could be caused by a problem in the back, such as kissing spines, or purely sore back muscles and a badly fitting saddle. Some horses who are weak over the back, perhaps due to age or level of training, may adopt this posture after being ridden if their muscles have become overtired. A horse lacking topline muscles may appear to have an inverted posture, and they can look to have a pot belly. Which will disappear as they start to use their abdominals properly as it will lift and shrink. Phoenix developed this posture just before she had her first physio session and it was due to tight muscles in her back. However, the change in her posture afterwards was instantaneous. For those horses who have adopted this position for a long time, to compensate or protect other areas of their body, it can take a long time to improve their stance.

Another horse I work with, who I actually suggested saw a physio, had a posture which always concerned me, he always rested his left fore and right hind, and held his nose pointing out, as if sore in the atlas area of his neck. He tended to hold his legs slightly out from under his body – hind legs camped out, and forelegs almost pointing. He just generally looked uncomfortable. I was really pleased this week when I rode him after two physio sessions; partly because he felt so much looser and more comfortable under saddle, as well as able to adopt the long and low posture, but he was also standing much more squarely, with his legs under him, and his head isn’t stuck out quite so much. Of course, he still needs some work from both the physio and his riders, to undo all the tightness and to rebuild the correct muscles, but I felt that we were heading in the right direction with him.

Another horse I’ve been working with, who is long and lanky in build, and always struggles to have a topline, has really improved since Christmas. He was working well for me, but wasn’t working consistently through the week and his posture was still very much inverted and I was really starting to get concerned that we’d have massive problems in the future, but thankfully after boot camp, and his owner increasing his workload, as well as his routine changing for the better, he’s starting to work more consistently for both of us. We’ve introduced a Pessoa session once a week to encourage him to work long and low without a rider’s weight, and over the last couple of weeks I’ve notice him standing more square both before and after exercise. His farrier noticed that he was much straighter since his last visit, and you can see the muscle in the top of his neck improving. After exercise he is also letting his fifth leg hang out, which whilst it grosses many people out, is a gospel sign that he’s used his abdominals. And as his abdominals tone up, his back will lift, and his topline will become engaged and improve. I’m really pleased with his progress and the improvement to his posture and muscle tone.

Each week I’m now trying to critique all the horses I work with, to assess their posture to see if they’re holding a limb awkwardly, or look uncomfortable in any area of their body, and we can then get them treated if necessary. I’m also becoming more aware of the small changes in their muscle development. Once you train your eye you can hone in on all the small details, such as the hindlegs being too far under their body or left out behind in the halt which suggests tightness in either the flexor or extensor set of muscles.

It’s worth trying to take a step back each week and assess your own horse’s posture as well as their body condition, and you’ll hopefully pick up on any problems nice and early and can get treatment or adjust your training plan accordingly.

Otis’s Massage

Yesterday afternoon Otis had another visit from the McTimoney chiropractor. It’s been eight weeks since her last visit, when he had all his problems with his right hind.

Whilst I didn’t think there was a problem with him, I thought it was best to get him checked out regularly.

Since his last treatment I’d spent four weeks lightly hacking him, building up his muscles and suppleness, and just going into the school once a week to assess his progress. We walked up hills and leg yielded along paths, but it took six weeks for him to feel one hundred percent even and normal. I had almost given up and rung the vet for a MOT when I rode him and realised the first trot felt strong and the diagonal pairs were even.

Since then he’s been in usual work and his jumping fitness built up steadily. At the end of July we went showjumping, where he jumped a double clear in both classes. I was really pleased and went home to enter our next one day event. Last weekend we competed at dressage and he felt very consistent and was second and fourth in two strong classes; I think the time spent suppling and strengthening him has really paid off.

Anyway, back to his massage. There weren’t any knots or sore spots other than what you would expect from an athlete, which is great news. However, Otis was a bit tight in his neck which I think is where he has braced himself against me treating his sore ear (which needed the vet to sedate and clean and is healing nicely) so hopefully that tension won’t reoccur.

The physio was very pleased with Otis and after a couple of days gentle exercise we are back to normal!