Leaving Lockdown

It’s been a while since I blogged. Life has been a bit crazy as lockdown has eased and the odd moment that I’ve had to myself I’ve needed to stare vacantly at an insipid TV programme. But there’s no hot water for my bath, so I thought I’d address my oversight whilst waiting for the boiler to do it’s job.

Not that I’m sure what to talk about, so let’s see where this meandering road will take me!

Has anyone else found the idea of coming out of lockdown slightly daunting? Well, very daunting to be honest.

I feel that we’ve slimmed down our diaries to the bare minimum. Essential jobs, outings etc. And realistically are only socialising with who we need to see. Yet we’ve filled our time so that we’re busy every day. How on earth will we fit in anything extra curricular?

Since Easter, I’ve been trying to get a handle on the elusive work-life balance, which has spiralled a bit out of control. We’re back up to three full days of childcare, and I’ve streamlined work into 3.5 weekdays, with Pony Club alternate weekends. Which, once the madness of going on long overdue day trips to visit family calms down, I’m hoping will feel like we have a reset day, and at least a day to do something different; be it a day at the zoo or a walk in the woods.

But then there comes the question as to what we actually want to do with this newfound freedom. I mean, what do we actually want to do? I’ve never been a fan of big crowds, and not having been in one for over a year definitely makes me wary of going out again. I think I’m also concerned about how activities and experiences will change as a result of new regulations and social distancing. I mean, I love going to the West End. But, there’s a lot of people in those narrow passageways, especially during the interval. I feel claustrophobic at the mere thought. And, will the social distancing and mask wearing affect the experience? There’s definitely an element of reluctance to dive straight in. Perhaps I’ll wait until a friend has been so they can feed back to me.

I’ve also been thinking carefully about what options life opening up will give us. And choosing one thing at a time to reintroduce. Even the simple things such as taking Phoenix out. You get out of the rhythm of it, can’t remember what equipment you need, can’t remember how to juggle child and pony. Then factor in the post-lockdown regulations I need to remember. But a few treadmill trips, hacks out with friends and clinics and I’ve refamiliarised myself with Pony adventures. However, the desire to compete hasn’t really returned yet!

Then at the same time I am really conscious of making sure we provide Mallory with stimulation, opportunities, and an education. But without creating a whirlwind lifestyle. This week, we started officially sharing a lovely Welsh section A pony. We’ll only go once a week, and I’ll follow her lead as to whether we hack (current favourite), trot around the arena (“don’t hold me Mum. I don’t need you to hold her!”), or meander over poles. Then we’re also eagerly awaiting for swimming pools to be opened for public swimming so we can make the water baby happy again and get her confident in the water again.

I’ve booked a slot to go trampolining next week; an activity that we loved before lockdown, but decided that we won’t return to her singing and dancing class until things get back to normal in terms of interaction because neither of us enjoyed the individual island like experience of before Christmas and I spent the entire time telling her not to interact with the other children. And otherwise, we’ll just hand pick activities on a weekly basis until we find the right balance for us.

I think emerging from this hibernation steadily will give us all chance to adapt, yet also make the decision as to what we actually want to do rather than being swept along with the crowd and overburdened with a hectic schedule, leaving us no time for the quiet, quality moments we’ve learnt to appreciate over the last fourteen months.

Sharers

I was asked the other day on my opinion on sharers, which is becoming a more and more popular option for horse owners. So here are my thoughts.

I’ve seen sharing arrangements which work really well for all parties, and I’ve also seen it go horribly wrong with the sharer fleeing at the first cold wind of winter or the first sign of lameness and the horse owner picking up the pieces.

For the horse owner, having a sharer can help reduce the workload of horse ownership; a sharer can make a financial contribution, help keep your horse exercised and fit, and help out with yard chores. Which can give you a lie in, or a day off from horses. It can help you maintain a healthy horse-family-work balance.

For the sharer, it’s an opportunity to forge a strong bond with a horse which you can’t do in a riding school environment, usually at a fraction of the cost. You get the horse ownership experience without the full time or financial commitment, which can work really well for those with young families or students.

Unfortunately though, I repeatedly see adverts on social media of young people who are basically looking for free rides in return for mucking out. Yes, I understand that financially they may not be able to afford riding lessons, but I worry that their naivety of riding unsupervised, plus the fact privately owned horses often have more get-up-and-go than riding school horses, poses a huge risk to the horse owner.

I still think that sharing arrangements can be a good solution for horse owners, it needs to be entered into carefully and with both eyes open.

Firstly, you need to decide why you want or need a sharer. Is it to help you exercise your horse as they can be too fizzy for you? Is it to give you a horse free day a couple of times a week? Is it to help cover your livery bill? Some share arrangements exchange riding for money whilst others exchange riding for chores. When advertising for a share you need to be very clear with what you expect in return.

Regardless of your sharing currency, there are a few hoops to jump through to help set up a successful share.

Firstly, insurance. You will have your own insurance, but you need to check that your horse is covered with other riders, or that other riders are covered. A good option is to get a sharer to take out BHS Gold membership as this will cover both them and your horse on the ground and in the saddle.

Assess their riding. Have them ride your horse under your supervision a few times, and doing all that they will want to do. So watch them school, pop a fence, and hack. They don’t need to be brilliant, but your horse shouldn’t be offended by their riding. Find out their riding goals, as it is really beneficial to have complementary aims. For example, if you like hacking and the sharer wants to do dressage this can provide variety for your horse. If you don’t like jumping then a sharer who does can be beneficial to your horse’s mental well being and fitness. However, regardless of what you both want to do, you need to have a similar approach to riding. For example, you don’t want to spend your days working your horse in a long and low frame to get them working over their back and relaxed, only for your sharer to undo all hard your work by pinning their heads in or galloping wildly round the countryside. I would strongly encourage sharers to have regular lessons, ideally with the same coach as the horse’s owner so that you can be sure you’re both singing off the same sheet, even if it’s at different levels.

The horse owner should watch how the potential sharer acts on the ground, whether they’re confident around horses and know their hoof pick from their body brush. Even if they’re straight out of a riding school and know very little, they can still learn. It’s worth the owner spending a few sessions with the sharer to help them build confidence on the ground and to set the owner’s mind at rest that their horse will be well cared for. Again, from an owner’s perspective, make sure you’re happy with the standard that the chores are done to when assessing the sharer. They can have room to learn, but you don’t want them doing a poor job and then you playing catch up the following day. It is also worth checking that the sharer is happy with any other horses they may have to deal with. For example, if your horse is in a field with one other then the sharer may well have to feed or hay both horses on their days, so they need to be happy with this, and the owner’s of the other horse does too.

I would also be careful of sharers who are fresh from the riding school as they often don’t foresee how time consuming the looking after aspect of horse care is, especially when they’re fumbling with tools or buckles, so can either shirk their duties and just chuck the tack on with a careless glance over the horse, or lose interest after a week. As an owner, your horse is your first priority and you want them to feel as loved by their sharer as they do by you. It’s definitely worth investing the time in training up a sharer so that they’re happy, your horse is happy, and you can then enjoy your horse free time without worrying.

Draw up a contract. This may seem formal, but it’s a useful reference point if anything goes wrong. The contract doesn’t have to be complicated but should contain the following subjects:

  • Insurance
  • Number of days and which days the sharer has use of the horse. The arrangement for flexibility or additional days (such as school holidays). How much warning needs to be given for changing days.
  • The chores or payment the sharer needs to provide in return for riding, and how often. Some sharers pay weekly, others monthly, some in advance and others in arrears. Some sharers have to do the chores for the entire day that they are riding the horse on, so for example turn out and muck out in the morning, and bringing in in the evening. Others just the jobs when they’re there to ride.
  • What the sharer can and cannot do with the horse. It may be that the horse has physical limitations (for example, an old injury which means they can’t be jumped too high or more than once a week) or that the owner doesn’t feel the sharer is competent enough to hack alone. However, there may be a clause that the sharer can compete or attend clinics with the approval of the owner.
  • What happens in the event of the horse going lame. Unfortunately I’ve seen many sharers up and go when the horse is injured and needs a period of box rest, leaving the owner high and dry. It may be that the sharer has such a bond with the horse that they want to continue caring for them without the benefit of riding, or the owner may have another horse the sharer can ride.
  • The notice period for terminating the contract. This may be a natural end because of the sharer outgrowing the horse, or changing jobs or moving house (or yard) but in order to end on a good note, it is more respectful to forewarn the owner.
  • Who is responsible for livery services? If for example, the sharer has to have the horse turned out on one their days, who foots the bill at the end of the month? Who is responsible for cleaning or repairing tack?

Of course, creating a sharing agreement is far more complicated than it initially seems, but having a good starting point for discussion helps both the horse owner and sharer work out what they want from, and what they can bring to, a sharing arrangement which will then hopefully have the horse’s welfare at its heart and makes for a lasting friendship between owner and sharer.